in my life: the TV screen arrives

Television (TV) had been "broadcasting since 1928, but not in Australia until 1956, two years after my birth.  In about 1960, dad brought home to 4 Ivy St, Burwood, a new Black and White Television and we all sat down after school to watch a free broadcast of "The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin" in mesmerised silence.
 

Soon we added more shows to the "must watch" list: The Lone Ranger, Jet Jackson, Mr Squiggle, Zig and Zag, F Troop; The Rifleman; Rawhide; Maverick; Bonanza, Have Gun will Travel; Hopalong Cassidy; Gunsmoke; Lawman; Sugarfoot; Daniel Boone; Zorro...... and so so many more.  Free TV signals beamed out from towers all over the country to rooftop or set-top aerials just like ours building a new cultural homogeneity far more powerful than that of the radio.  Seen initally as a force for education, it's overwhelming use was as entertainment. 

Our afternoon routine now completely revolved around negotiating more time in front of the TV in exchange for anything: homework completion, cleaning bedrooms, combing mum's hair etc etc.
In our family, reading books were assumed to be a natural good. Only the most cursory attempt was made to encourage sleep over late night reading.  Radio was never popular enough to require supervision. TV was imediately recognised as an addictive information technology with less inherent benefit. 
Our watching continued on weekends even into secondary school.  After school sport on Saturday mornings, we recovered our energy in front of "Epic Theatre" where "sword and sandals" movies gave us lots of gore and a mix of history and myth. 
On Sundays, after I returned from choir at St. Mark's Church Camberwell, we would, without supervision,  watch "World Champioship Wrestling" introduced by the wierd Jack Little on Sunday Morning with characters like "Killer Kowalski".  In the late 1960's and a secondary student, I loved listening to the unusual speach patterns and fascinating political analysis of B A Santamaria - alone on Sunday TV.

The world remained BW through the 1969 moon landing.  My class stopped at Scotch College, Hawthorn and we were all ushered into the gym where we sat on the floor watched what was probably a 23in TV with quiet amazement.

Australian TV only became colourful after I had left school for university in the mid 1970's.

TV was the dominant source of entertainment for me from the early 1960’s. 

I still regarded books as an intellectually superior medium (as I do in 2022). Books require intellectual engagement for 10, 20 or 30 hours - vastly longer than any TV show. Some long running TV series (The West Wing, Breaking Bad) are worthy of being considered a coherent single work (as are the collected episodes that form many of Charles Dickens’ work. 



the late 1980’s. 

















The next type of information technology that came into my life was, unlike the ancient technology of books, a new global phenomenon heralding the start of the information revolution. I feel privileged to be living during this technological revolution (para phrasingt eh Chinese curse: "May you live in interesting times."). For me it has been a wonderful world of enjoying information access greater than any generation in human history. Information access dominates my recreation: music, entertainment, books, news - all are now delivered to me digitally. Information manipulation also became a major part of my career.









TV continued to dominate our entertainment and that of our children, Lucy and Sam for many decades with far tighter access contriols than I had to live with as a child. The content moved from the bloodless stylised violence and absence of sex, to gruesome realistic violence and ubiquitous and distorted sexuality. Nevertheless, it's shared experience maintained and defined many shared cultural experiences (the winning of the America's Cup) and icons (Crocodile Dundee) that has dissappeared in Australia.




Now in 2020, use of TV has shrunk to a tiny fraction of the previous dominance. Lib's addiction to the 7pm ABC news and the occassional "free to air" football match are the remaining vestiges. Most football matches, like other entertainment is direct from "streaming services" rather than from TV channels.




During my late primary school and early secondary school years (?), my love of classical music was developing through encouragement of my mother, Elspeth, membership of St Mark's Choir, piano lessons and the availability of a huge and growing vinyl record collection.

Phonograph record technology dates from the late 1800's and used a variety of materials to record and play back an analogue musical signal at increasingly high levels of quality. the vinyl resocrs that we collected are considered by some as th most HiFi (High Fidelity) recordings because of their "warmth.




The record collection was an accident of fortune arising from my father, Geoff's major contract employment as Art Director for the "World Record Club". This mail order vinyl record sales company received large numbers of returns - accepted with no questions aske. Many Saturday mornings, I would convince my father to take me down to <address> and allow me to select 20 or 30 records from the returns to take home. As these were destined to be pulverised we had no moral qualms. Through this process we accumulated over 2000 records. these records gave me and my mother many hours of pleasure. I




, many of which I digitally converted. In 2020, all this vinyl has at last been pulverised but the covers have been retained by Swinburne University of technology Art Department for their artistci and design merit.

I spend hundredsof hours cataloguing thes records adn in later years, re-recording them into digital format. Only a few hundred of these recordings remain in my 3000 track recording library as most have gradually been replaced by higher quality digital recordsings of the same or a better performance.

Much to the annoyance of my son, i also like "improving"




After TV, the next tech of importance in my life was radio. My love of radio started with glandular fever. I had a "crystal" radio with which I could listen to shows all throught the many nights that I could not sleep due to the fever. My night time companions were the Goons, the Argonauts Club https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argonauts_Club, the News show that arrived at crash scenes before the Police and interviews witnesse live !!! (In 1969 there were 78 deaths per 100000 vehicles compared to 2014 when there was 4 deaths per 100000 vehicles !! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_motor_vehicle_deaths_in_Australia_by_year)

One of the most vibrant memories is the sound of oars propelling a boat in water on a silent night as occurred in The Argonauts more than once. Listening to this in a darkened room was somehow more poweful than any image I can imagine.

I still enjoy the intimacy of listening to disembodied voices but, apart from Lib's addiction to 7am ABC radion news, i hear these voices as "podcasts" usually while driving to and from work.




Technology took the next leap in 1974 when Scotch College secondary school started using the MONECS https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MONECS system to teach us programming as an activity within mathematics classes. We were taught the MINITRAN language and could test our programs by "punching out" "chads" from a card with a paperclip for every line of our program. The cards were sent to Monash university and our results were returned a day or so later. The disappointment of a single mistake creating a multi-day delay encouraged a very displined approach. The first personal computers in the worlds were to be manufactured within a few years. Nevertheless, I left secondary school still using a "slide rule" and Four-figure mathematical tables / G.W.C. Kaye and T.H. Laby https://library2.deakin.edu.au/record=b1427596~S1




==============================================================




technology took the next leap....

Change

I was lucky to be one of the first Australian students to be taught programming in school. In 1969, my maths teacher at Scotch College was involved with the introduction of computers at Monash University and taught my maths class Minitran. I beleive that he personally drove our punch cards to Monash and ran them through the MONECS system for us. This was 5 years before the official release of the system to secondary schools in 1974. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MONECS










During my years at Uni studying medicine and pharmacology, digital technology was not used. At home during this time we were completly content with a 12in colour(?) TV inside a bedside cupboard as our screen, and a "cassette tape" player as music storage and listening system.




My next brush with technology was at Knox Technical School (location ? ) years ? where I was teaching maths myself. In 1982, the school principal was keen to get the computers into the school and obtained funding for a very new and innovative networkable computer developed by the BBC for education https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC_Micro. As the most technically literate, youngest and most enthusiastic maths teacher, I leapt at the opportunity to take charge of this project. Within a few months we had a very sophisticated network of 2 computer rooms complete with computer stands that I had designed and manufactured with the help of students. The BBC Micro ran a very sophisticated computer language called BBC Basic which, unlike standard BASIC, allowed subroutines to be called by name from anywhere in the program - a feature usually found only in higher level languages. This allowed far more flexible and interesting teaching projects to be developed.

The system also included a very sophisticated network server which "served" the computers a huge range of curriculum software whose quality compares well with many teaching programs available in 2020 ! (see graphs and green globs

In running this system for a few years, I acquired "hands on" skilsl in programming BASIC, Pascal, Fortran and knowledge of computer hardware management, networking and experience with a range of software.




I was sad to leave this technology behind when I accepted a promotion to run a teacher training network for primary teachers in Blackburn Primary School. Doubly, so when when I started work with the primitive Commodore 64 which ran on a network powered by standard audio cassettes which communicated digital data through sound that sounded like "white noise".https://youtu.be/ITfKILfsItA?t=52




In 1987(?), I was rescued from this cave via a promotion to manage the conversion of 4 portable classrooms in Parkmore Primary School into a Regional Computer Education Centre (RCEC). I got the chance to hire my own staff, design and contract the renovations, design and manufacture my own computer furniture..... but not choose the computers. The choice of the newest IBM Personal Computer, the JX, was determined by a state contract https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_JX




Teacher education relating to IT was now my central area of expertise and interest.

In 19??, it, that is IT, also forced Lib and I to confronty the most important life choice of our lives.




I worked with a statewide team of RCEC managers that beleived that the state choice of the JX hardware lead to lower quality software options for education of students than the more expensive Apple computer systems.




In ???? just before muchledford




Apple offered me a job at 3 times my current salary contribute to their education design and marketing team.... in Sydney......




Lib and I thought long and hard about balancing a move to Sydney into the "fast lane" of high pay, corporate working hours, less secure employment, shorter working career followed by retirement to the country etc etc.... and most importantly and contentiously, whether and where children fitted into the picture. At last, after taking our relationship to the brink, we decided to decline the offer and and move to the country and start a family as soon as possible.




Back to IT.... Leaving the RCEC to take any Education Department job in Castlemaine, I lost all the hardware access that came with the job. I bought an Apple IIe computer with green monochrome screen and 2 5.25in floppy drives (The computer would load the operating system from one drive each time it started and then could load a program from the other drive (e.g. wordprocessor or Lady Tut) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Apple_II_games




This computer was the only computer for years and it's use was mainly email, wordporcessing and games. Internet access in those days was via sound modulated modem which was unreliable and extremely slow.




When I transferred to Castlemaine Technical College which then amalgamated with Castlemaine High School, I was teaching mathematics nearly exclusively for a few years before gaining the job of school computer coordinator.




In 199???, when we went around australia in a caravan, I had set myself the task of converting a wonderful primary school maths resource into an online activity library. Using a portable 3 line display word processor, I worked on this in spare moments duringt he whole trip. The task remains unfinished - but still worthwhile as such quality teaching activities have never been superceded.

In those days there was no access to telephone contact while trabelling, let alone the internet.




We went through a number of computers

I have always beleoved that the best price and reliability is acheived by being a few models behind the latest.




Our next computer was an Apple Macintosh??




Bought Apple mac in USA and brought home unaware of the https://www.webopedia.com/DidYouKnow/Hardware_Software/MonitorHemispheres.asp




When the limitations of the social milleux for our children drove us to move back to Melbourne, I won a job as computer manager at Cheltenham Secondary College and stayed in that role until retirement.




IT Xbox




Apple "TV"

In my life: books and their uses

My mother was an insatiable reader. She belonged to book clubs most of her life - sometime actively involved in two at a time. Her favourite genre was biography and autobiography and piles of these tomes would be beside her bed and in various rooms.

My father rarely read for pleasure.  His favourite genre historical fact.  Nevertheless, he also accumulated many beautiful old illustrated books for their potential to inspire his team of record album designers at the World Record Club.  In about 1966, I moved all the volumes of a beaultifully illustrated nature encycloedia into my room.  I decided one of the volumes of the rarely opened set would make a good secret hideaway.  I used dad's cutting instruments (as an artist his desk was full of expensive toys whose constant dissappearance would infuriate him).  I cut a large hole through the central pages. I have no memory of what I stored in there, but about 5 years later, my father discovered this vandalism and was not amused. 

Another unanticipated outcome from my browsing the family bookshelves was the discovery of  "The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio" and soon after "30 Droll Stories" by Balzac (based on "Les Cent Contes drolatiques".  Within the complex and verbose prose, I found, to my delight, that the stories were all about sex !  I am not sure whether mum or dad ever read them and my brothers were either not readers, or too young to penetrate the texts.  For years, I enjoyed reading from these before sleep....        

In my life: Bennetswood Primary School

Even now at 68 years, I can recapture the excitement and awe as I took my seat in grade 1 (1960, age 6) at Bennettswood State School.  

Mr Wigney's class was arranged in rows from grade 1 to 6 so that he could train teachers for rural schools in vistoria where all grades were in the same class.

The full kit of uniforn, fresh stationery and equipment for school was like experiencing a second christmas. I still love fresh stationery !  Other equipment was exciting because of unknown uses such as the compass and the map stencils. I loved creating maps with the blue sea carefully shaded all around our island.


I had been introduced to writing in Box Hill South Kindergarten.  In grade 1, with the grade 2's in the desk beside me, I set to work with determination to better myself. 
.
By April 1960, I was enjoying telling stories

I fell in love with cuisenaire and the language of maths used to describe it with a feeling similar to that I have since experienced in playing computer games or programming. A superbly logical and beautiful symbolic world where knowing and obeying the rules is always the winning strategy.

Not me, but similar to my memory. Source: A Teaching Aide that survived the 1950's

In the brutal honesty of the 1960's, acheivement had real world implications. I was soon rewarded by Mr. Wigney by swapping me with the child in front in recognition of our relative performance. 
In school uniform, eating a sandwhich in the bare backyard of 4 Ivy St, Burwood, in Dad's photoshoot for a Tip-Top bread advert.

One learning activity that still fills me with dread was the film on fire safety shown to the whole school in the darkened gym.  Instead of a dry set of priciples and procedures, I remember children falling out windows to thier deaths and then being covered with white sheets on the ground outside.  I still have a feeling of dread from this experience.  
These images seem far too frightening to show to a school group even in those days.  After looking at a number of images and movie extracts relating to the fire at Our Lady of the Angels in 1958 where 92 pupils and 3 nuns died, I think that I may have constructed my memory from some of the film and stills of this event that may have been shown on to the school on that day.

It is a reminder that all memory is constructed and that, not only have I forgotten so much from the nearly 25000 days of my life, but I have also managed to misremember some of it !
It is bizarre what memories have been retained.  At Bennetswood, there were rows of seats parallel to the building before the car park was created.  One had to jostle for space to eat lunch.  One day I jostled too enthuisiatically and dislodged a pie from the hands of a hungry pupil.  I knew there would be consequences, so without excuse or apology, I ran from the scene as fast as possible.  A few steps away, the remains of the pie that had been quickly picked up and expertly thrown, landed square in the middle ogf my back !   

Bennettswood State School main building 1960's

Out of class, before school, at recess, lunchtime and after school, there were many enticing activities that came in and out of fashion for no discernable reason.

The wads of swap cards that I took to school were nearly too big to hold and even harder to display to discerning swappers, and extract when the deal was done.  Cards depicted  everything from cats to cars, from planes to places etc.  They were fascinating in themselves, but also provided a brutal education in the pitfalls of fast negotiation.   

Not my card set but similar to my memories.

Marbles was played under the large playground pine trees where the roots acted as bench seats and the canopy dropped pine needles killing all vegetation that would have otherwise interfered with the marble roll.  "Tom bowlers", taw's, cat's eyes, aggies were played, lost and won over many hours in the dust to high emotion and much argument.
 
Not me, but similar to my memories.

I loved the 1km walk to school and home.  The house construction progress in this new suburb was constantly changing the landscape. In winter, the puddles, left by heavy wheels on nature strips, were frozen and after jumping on them, the panes of ice were fun to throw. 

One shocking day, I was approaching school, and heard the screech of brakes and a scream.  I and every one else broke into run towards the catastrophe driven by irrestistable curiosity.  Upon arriving, the crowd was so large it was hard to penentrate.  All I could see was a limp child in our school uniform and some dark blood stains on their jumper.   I cannot remember the outcome for the pupil but I am pretty sure that the intensity of the memory affected the care with which I crossed Station Street in future.

When the principal of the school died, there was no such shock or concern 

In my life: first books

My parents believed strongly in the power of reading to support learning and thus education and thus success in life.  My mother told me that I fell in love with picture books well before I could speak, and learnt to read easily and quickly.

I have no specific memories of being read to by my mother or father. Neither has my father although he is pretty sure that it happened ! It is sad that so much of the wonderful moments of childhood are not able to be recalled in adult life, but we comfort ourselves in the belief that they form a subconscious foundation belief in being loved and valued.

I was as scared as "Little Black Sambo" at the fierce tigers demanding clothes and other belongings. The tigers defeated themselved by their infighting and ended up as butter on pancakes ! 

This book was later issued as a vynl recording that Dad brought home from work at the World Record Club and included memorable songs to accompany the action. 
In this millenium, most parents would probably be afraid to be caught exposing their children to the streotypes used in the text and illustrations (while happily and subliminally replacing them with whatever were the currently acceptable stereotypes). 
  

I probably met "John and Betty" in grade 1 (age 6, 1960)

During grade 2-6 (age 7-11, 1961-1965), I began reading more and more independently and insatiably: Madeleine series (Bemelmans);  The Water Babies (Kingsley); The Borrowers (Norton); Charlotte's web (White); The Famous Five series (Blyton); The Chronicles of Narnia Series (Lewis); The Cossacks and "Save the Khan" (Bartos-Hoppner) etc etc etc.  

These titles are just some that spring immediately to mind, and some may have been read to me before I was an independent reader.  Each still evokes its particular excitement and desire to revisit - already with my children - and hopefully with my grandchildren.

Once I had mastered code of written language, the rewards were immense.  I had a ticket of entry into a seemingly limitless array of virtual worlds that have enticed me for the rest of my life.  

After being told to "go to bed" (from 1961 I had my own room), I would resume the adventure and read until I fell asleep.  The bed has been my preferred reading location all my life.  In recent decades, the text is usually displayed on my iPhone rather than on a paper page - and, as I get older, sleep interferes more quickly !

In the early 1960's. I was introduced to many major stories from Western Culture through the "Classics Illustrated" Comic Series and "The Bible in Pictures".  The effect of text integrated with illustrations made the stories vivid and easy to navigaet. I tried to sell these experiences to my children with mixed success.

My next specific remembrance of reading was in 1967 at 79 Broadway, Camberwell, during an absence from Year 7 school of many months due to glandular fever that developed from food poisoning caused by eating cabana from Camberwell market on the way home from school.  
During these months, I devoured books provided from school.  The most memorable memory is of reading the Hobbit followed by The Lord of the Rings trilogy by JRR Tolkein. I remember finishing the final pages of the final book on a "literally" dark and stormy night to the accompaniment of thunderclaps !!! I tried the Hobbit on Lucy but the attack of the spiders gave her a powerful hallucinogenic nightmare so I don't think we persisted. From 2001, I was privileged to enjoy the movie version both directly and vicariously to enjoy the movie version with Lucy and Sam with parts released each "boxing" day.

My wife, Lib, and I recognised the importance of encouraging and assisting our children to be skilled readers who love to read.  Unlike the learning of spoken language, there are no natural genetic structures to help the child, making parents so crucial.  We are delighted that our children made the most of this immense but intangible gift, and are passing on the same culteral advantage to our grandchildren.


In my life: memory

My memory allows full sequential replay for a few days back.  Go back a few weeks and the snippets are frequent but the continuity is gone. The surviving memories - images, sounds, and sometimes smells - become gradually fewer and fewer the further back I journey. 

The memory "film" of my first 5 years has faded to white, with only a few seemingly random images, sounds, smells and feelings remaining.  Perhaps they are significant. Perhaps they are merely memorable.  Nevertheless, their rarity makes these explicit memories precious... to me.

This is not to say that these snippets are reliable or unchangeable .... just that they are vibrant and evocative to me.

One memories that "feels" ancient and occurs in a freezing room is just being alone in bed, under the covers with a torch.  My  mother beleived that this memory was recorded at "The Shingles", Prey Heath Rd, Woking, England where we lived for a year or so when I was about 3 years old.  




Why is this memory so clear .... and so alone ? I cannot remember any other factor contributing to the memory.  No sense of guilt (staying up too late?  pinch the torch ?).  No-one there with me. 

Another memory presumed to be from this winter is the spectacle of milk emerging from the top of a frozen milk bottle delivered to our door.


Consid all the sights and sounds of a trip across the world in an ocean liner to London, and later, the English countryside.  I cannot remember anything of that trip other than these two images.  How frustrating.

It seems that these memories alone, by chance or unknown significant escaped the active culling of memory that is especially intense in the first 5 years of life.  I would love to be able to accurately replay an real time movie of my life.  As one grew older with this ability, past memories would accumulate until the temptation to replay the past could distract from dealing with the opresent and future. This may be one of the reasons that these memories are actively eliminated.

Leunig - Present past future



   

Opera Le Nozze di Figaro (The Marriage of Figaro) by Mozart - Libretto (Italian/ English)

Le Nozze di Figaro  (The Marriage of Figaro)
Opera buffa in quattro atti  (Opera buffa in four acts)
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756 - 1791)  (Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756 - 1791)
Extracted from http://opera.stanford.edu/iu/libretti/figaro.htm.  Google translate english attached to each line.

Libretto di Lorenzo da Ponte (1749 - 1838)  (Libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte (1749 - 1838)

Prima rappresentazione: Vienna, Burgtheater 1. maggio 1786  (First performance: Vienna, Burgtheater 1. May 1786)

Personaggi:  (Characters:)
Il Conte di Almaviva  (The Count of Almaviva)
La Contessa di Almaviva  (The Countess of Almaviva)
Susanna  (Susanna)
Figaro  (Figaro)
Cherubino  (Cherubino)
Marcellina  (Marcellina)
Bartolo  (Bartolo)
Basilio  (Basilio)
Don Curzio  (Don Curzio)
Barbarina  (Barbarina)
Antonio  (Antonio)
Due Donne  (Two Women)
Coro di Contadini  (Peasant Choir)
Atto primo  (Act one)
Atto secondo  (Act two)
Atto terzo  (Act three)
Atto quarto  (Act four)

ATTO PRIMO  (ACT ONE)

Camera non affatto ammobiliata, una sedia d'appoggio in mezzo  (Room not furnished at all, a support chair in the middle)

SCENA I  (SCENE I)
Figaro con una misura in mano e Susanna allo specchio che si sta mettendo un capellino ornato di fiori  (Figaro with a measure in hand and Susanna in the mirror putting on a hat decorated with flowers)

N. 1 Duettino  (N. 1 Duettino)

FIGARO
(misurando)  (measuring)
Cinque... dieci.... venti... trenta... trentasei...quarantatre  (Five ... ten ... twenty ... thirty ... thirty-six ... forty-three)

SUSANNA
(specchiandosi)  (looking at)
Ora sì ch'io son contenta;  (herself ) Now I am happy;)
sembra fatto inver per me.  (seems to be done for me.)
Guarda un po', mio caro Figaro,  (Look, my dear Figaro,)
guarda adesso il mio cappello.  (look at my hat now.)

FIGARO
Sì mio core, or è più bello,  (Yes my heart, now it is more beautiful, it)
sembra fatto inver per te.  (seems to have been done for you.)

SUSANNA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA and F IGARO)
Ah, il mattino alle nozze vicino  (Ah, in the morning at the wedding,)
quanto è dolce al mio/tuo tenero sposo  (how sweet is)
questo bel cappellino vezzoso  (this lovely little hat)
che Susanna ella stessa si fe'.  (that Susanna made herselfto my / your tender husband.)

Recitativo

SUSANNA
Cosa stai misurando,  (What are you measuring,)
caro il mio Figaretto?  (my dear Figaretto?)

FIGARO
Io guardo se quel letto  (I see if that bed)
che ci destina il Conte  (the Count has destined for us)
farà buona figura in questo loco.  (will make a good impression in this place.)

SUSANNA
E in questa stanza?  (And in this room?)

FIGARO
Certo: a noi la cede  (Of course:)
generoso il padrone.  (the ownergives it to usgenerously.)

SUSANNA
Io per me te la dono.  (I give it to you for me.)

FIGARO
E la ragione?  (And the reason?)

SUSANNA
(toccandosi la fronte)  (touching her forehead)
La ragione l'ho qui.  (The reason is here.)

FIGARO
(facendo lo stesso)  (doing the same)
Perché non puoi  (Why can't you)
far che passi un po' qui?  (let me spend a little while here?)

SUSANNA
Perché non voglio.  (Because I don't want to.)
Sei tu mio servo, o no?  (Are you my servant or not?)

FIGARO
Ma non capisco  (But I don't understand)
perché tanto ti spiace  (why you are so sorry about)
la più comoda stanza del palazzo.  (the most comfortable room in the building.)

SUSANNA
Perch'io son la Susanna, e tu sei pazzo.  (Because I am Susanna, and you are crazy.)

FIGARO
Grazie; non tanti elogi! Guarda un poco  (Thanks; not much praise! See)
se potriasi star meglio in altro loco.  (if you could be better off somewhere else.)

N. 2 Duettino  (N. 2 Duettino)

FIGARO
Se a caso madama  (If by chance madame)
la notte ti chiama,  (the night calls you,)
din din; in due passi  (din din; in two steps)
da quella puoi gir.  (from that you can turn.)
Vien poi l'occasione  (Then comes the opportunity)
che vuolmi il padrone,  (that the master wants me,)
don, don; in tre salti  (don, don; in three jumps)
lo vado a servir.  (I go to serve him.)

SUSANNA
Così se il mattino  (So if in the morning)
il caro Contino,  (dear Contino,)
din din; e ti manda  (din din; and sends you)
tre miglia lontan,  (three miles away,)
don don; a mia porta  (don don;)
il diavol lo porta,  (the devil takes himto my door,)
ed ecco in tre salti ...  (and here it is in three leaps ...)

FIGARO
Susanna, pian, pian.  (Susanna, slowly, slowly)

SUSANNA
Ascolta ...  (Listen ...)

FIGARO  (F IGARO Hurry)
Fa presto ...  (up ...)

SUSANNA
Se udir brami il resto,  (If hearing you crave the rest,)
discaccia i sospetti  (dispel the suspicions)
che torto mi fan.  (that they are doing me wrong.)

FIGARO
Udir bramo il resto,  (Heard I crave the rest,)
i dubbi, i sospetti  (doubts, suspicions)
gelare mi fan.  (freeze me.)

Recitativo

SUSANNA
Or bene; ascolta, e taci!  (Well now; listen, and shut up!)

FIGARO
Parla: che c'è di nuovo?  (Speak: what's new?)

SUSANNA
Il signor Conte,  (The Count,)
stanco di andar cacciando le straniere  (tired of chasing away foreign)
bellezze forestiere,  (beauties,)
vuole ancor nel castello  (still wants to)
ritentar la sua sorte,  (try his fate againin the castle,)
né già di sua consorte, bada bene,  (nor does his wife already, mind you, he has an)
appetito gli viene ...  (appetite ...)

FIGARO
E di chi dunque?  (And whose then?)

SUSANNA  (SUSANNA About)
Della tua Susanetta  (your Susanetta)

FIGARO
Di te?  (Of you?)

SUSANNA
Di me medesma; ed ha speranza,  (Of myself; and he hopes)
che al nobil suo progetto  (that)
utilissima sia tal vicinanza.  (this closenessto his noble project will bevery useful.)

FIGARO
Bravo! Tiriamo avanti.  (Bravo! We carry on.)

SUSANNA
Queste le grazie son, questa la cura  (These are the graces, this is the care)
ch'egli prende di te, della tua sposa.  (he takes for you, for your wife.)

FIGARO
Oh, guarda un po', che carità pelosa!  (Oh, look, what a hairy charity!)

SUSANNA
Chetati, or viene il meglio: Don Basilio,  (Quiet, now the best is coming: Don Basilio,)
mio maestro di canto, e suo mezzano,  (my singing teacher, and his pimp,)
nel darmi la lezione  (ingivingme the lesson he)
mi ripete ogni dì questa canzone.  (repeats this song to me every day.)

FIGARO
Chi? Basilio? Oh birbante!  (Who? Basilio? Oh rascal!)

SUSANNA
E tu credevi  (And you thought)
che fosse la mia dote  (it was my gift)
merto del tuo bel muso!  (thanks to your beautiful face!)

FIGARO
Me n'ero lusingato.  (I was flattered.)

SUSANNA
Ei la destina  (Ei destines)
per ottener da me certe mezz'ore...  (to obtain from me certain half hours ...)
che il diritto feudale...  (the feudal right ...)

FIGARO
Come? Ne' feudi suoi  (How?)
non l'ha il Conte abolito?  (Hasn't the Count abolished it inhis fiefdoms?)

SUSANNA
Ebben; ora è pentito, e par che tenti  (Ebben; now he is repentant, and seems to be trying to)
Riscattarlo da me.  (Redeem it from me.)

FIGARO
Bravo! Mi piace:  (Bravo! I like:)
Che caro signor Conte!  (What a dear Mr. Count!)
Ci vogliam divertir: trovato avete...  (We want to have fun: found you ...)
(Si sente suonare un campanello)  (A bell)
Chi suona? La Contessa.  (rings ) Who rings? The Countess.)

SUSANNA
Addio, addio, Figaro bello ...  (Farewell, farewell, handsome Figaro ...)

FIGARO
Coraggio, mio tesoro.  (Courage, my darling.)

SUSANNA
E tu, cervello.  (And you, brain.)
(parte)  (part)

SCENA II  (SCENE II)
Figaro solo  (Figaro alone)

FIGARO
Bravo,signor padrone! Ora incomincio  (Bravo, master! Now I begin)
a capir il mistero... e a veder schietto  (to understand the mystery ... and to see)
tutto il vostro progetto: a Londra è vero?  (your whole projectfrankly: in London is it true?)
Voi ministro, io corriero, e la Susanna ...  (You minister, I courier, and Susanna ...)
secreta ambasciatrice.  (secret ambassador.)
Non sarà, non sarà. Figaro il dice.  (It will not be, it will not be. Figaro the says.)

N. 3 Cavatina  (N. 3 Cavatina)

FIGARO
Se vuol ballare  (If you want to dance)
Signor Contino,  (Signor Contino, I'll play)
il chitarrino  (the little guitar)
le suonerò.  (.)
Se vuol venire  (If you want to come)
nella mia scuola  (to my school I will teach you)
la capriola  (the somersault)
le insegnerò.  (.)
Saprò... ma piano,  (I will know ... but slowly,)
meglio ogni arcano  (better every arcane)
dissimulando  (disguising)
scoprir potrò!  (I will be able to discover!)
L'arte schermendo,  (The art shielding,)
l'arte adoprando,  (the art using,)
di qua pungendo,  (on this side bypricking,on the other side)
di là scherzando,  (by joking, I will overturn)
tutte le macchine  (all the machines)
rovescerò.  (.)
Se vuol ballare  (If)
Signor Contino,  (Signor Continowants to dance, I'll play)
il chitarrino  (the little guitar)
le suonerò.  (.)
(parte)  (part)

SCENA III  (SCENE III)
Bartolo e Marcellina con un contratto in mano  (Bartolo and Marcellina with a contract in hand)

Recitativo

BARTOLO  (B ARTICLE)
Ed aspettaste il giorno  (And did you wait for the day)
fissato a le sue nozze  (fixed for his wedding)
per parlarmi di questo?  (to talk to me about this?)

MARCELLINA
Io non mi perdo,  (I do not lose)
dottor mio, di coraggio:  (my courage, my doctor:)
per romper de' sponsali  (to break marriages)
più avanzati di questo  (more advanced than this,)
bastò spesso un pretesto, ed egli ha meco,  (a pretext was often enough, and he has with me,)
oltre questo contratto, certi impegni...  (beyond this contract, certain commitments ...)
so io...basta...convien  (I know ... that's enough ...)
la Susanna atterrir. Convien con arte  (Susannamust beterrified. It is)
impuntigliarli a rifiutar il Conte.  (convenient toartfullystop them refusing the Count.)
Egli per vendicarsi  (He)
prenderà il mio partito,  (will take my sidein revenge,)
e Figaro così fia mio marito.  (and so Figaro will be my husband.)

BARTOLO  (B ARTOLO)
(prende il contratto dalle mani di Marcellina)  (takes the contract from Marcellina's hands)
Bene, io tutto farò: senza riserve  (Well, I'll do everything: without reservations,)
tutto a me palesate.  (everything will be revealed to me.)
(Avrei pur gusto  (I would also like)
di dar per moglie la mia serva antica  (to give my ancient servant as a wife)
a chi mi fece un dì rapir l'amica.)  (to someone who one day stole my friend.)

N. 4 Aria  (No. 4 Air)

BARTOLO  (B ARTOLO)
La vendetta, oh, la vendetta!  (Revenge, oh, revenge!)
È un piacer serbato ai saggi.  (It is a pleasure reserved for the wise.)
L'obliar l'onte e gli oltraggi  (The oblivion of the onslaught and the outrages)
è bassezza, è ognor viltà.  (is baseness, it is every cowardice.)
Con l'astuzia...coll'arguzia...  (With cunning ... with wit ...)
col giudizio...col criterio...  (with judgment ... with criterion ...)
si potrebbe...il fatto è serio...  (one could ... the fact is serious ...)
ma credete si farà.  (but believe it willhappen.)
Se tutto il codice  (If all the code)
dovessi volgere,  (were to turn,)
se tutto l'indice  (if the whole index)
dovessi leggere,  (were to read,)
con un equivoco,  (with a misunderstanding,)
con un sinonimo  (with a synonym,)
qualche garbuglio  (some tangle)
si troverà.  (will be found.)
Tutta Siviglia  (All Seville)
conosce Bartolo:  (knows Bartolo:)
il birbo Figaro  (the naughty Figaro)
vostro sarà.  (will be yours.)
(parte)  (part)

SCENA IV  (SCENE IV)
Marcellina, poi Susanna con cuffia da donna, un nastro e un abito da donna  (Marcellina, then Susanna with a woman's cap, a ribbon and a woman's dress)

Recitativo

MARCELLINA
Tutto ancor non ho perso:  (I have not lost everything yet:)
mi resta la speranza.  (hope remains.)
Ma Susanna si avanza:  (But Susanna moves forward:)
io vo' provarmi...  (I want to try ...)
Fingiam di non vederla.  (Let's pretend not to see her.)
E quella buona perla  (And that good pearl)
la vorrebbe sposar!  (would like to marry her!)

SUSANNA
(resta indietro)  (stays behind)
(Di me favella)  ( Talk about me)

MARCELLINA
Ma da Figaro alfine  (But in Figaro)
non può meglio sperarsi: argent fait tout.  (we cannot hope better: argent fait tout.)

SUSANNA
(Che lingua! Manco male  (What a language! Not badly that)
ch'ognun sa quanto vale.)  (everyone knows what it's worth.)

MARCELLINA
Brava! Questo è giudizio!  (Brava! This is judgment!)
Con quegli occhi modesti,  (With those modest eyes,)
con quell'aria pietosa,  (with that pitiful air,)
e poi...  (and then ...)

SUSANNA  (SUSANNA It)
Meglio è partir.  (is better to leave.)

MARCELLINA
Che cara sposa!  (What a dear bride!)
(Vanno tutte due per partire e s'incontrano alla porta.)  (They both go to leave and meet at the door.)

N. 5 Duettino  (N. 5 Duettino)

MARCELLINA
(facendo una riverenza)  (making a curtsy)
Via resti servita,  (Via you remain served,)
Madama brillante.  (brilliant Madam.)

SUSANNA
(facendo una riverenza)  (making a curtsy)
Non sono sì ardita,  (I'm not so bold,)
madama piccante.  (spicy madam.)

MARCELLINA
(riverenza)  (reverence)
No, prima a lei tocca.  (No, it's your turn first.)

SUSANNA
(riverenza)  (reverence)
No, no, tocca a lei.  (No, no, it's up to her.)

SUSANNA e MARCELLINA  (SUSANNA and MARCELLINA)
(riverenze)  (reverences)
Io so i dover miei,  (I know my duties, I do)
non fo inciviltà.  (not do incivility.)

MARCELLINA
(riverenza)  (reverence)
La sposa novella!  (The new bride!)

SUSANNA
(riverenza)  (reverence)
La dama d'onore!  (The lady of honor!)

MARCELLINA
(riverenza)  (reverence)
Del Conte la bella!  (Del Conte the beautiful!)

SUSANNA
(riverenza)  (reverence)
Di Spagna l'amore!  (Love of Spain!)

MARCELLINA
I meriti!  (The merits!)

SUSANNA
L'abito!  (The dress!)

MARCELLINA
Il posto!  (The place!)

SUSANNA
L'età!  (Age!)

MARCELLINA
Per Bacco, precipito,  (By Bacchus, I fall,)
se ancor resto qua.  (if I still stay here.)

SUSANNA  (SUSANNA Decrepit sibyl)
Sibilla decrepita,  (,)
da rider mi fa.  (makes me a rider.)
(Marcellina parte)  (Marcellina leaves)

SCENA V  (SCENE V)
Susanna e poi Cherubino  (Susanna and then Cherubino)

Recitativo

SUSANNA
Va' là, vecchia pedante,  (Go there, old pedantic,)
dottoressa arrogante,  (arrogant doctor,)
perché hai letti due libri  (because you have read two books)
e seccata madama in gioventù...  (and annoyed madam in your youth ...)

CHERUBINO
(esce in fretta)  (exits quickly)
Susanetta, sei tu?  (Susanetta, is that you?)

SUSANNA
Son io, cosa volete?  (It's me, what do you want?)

CHERUBINO
Ah, cor mio, che accidente!  (Ah, my heart, what an accident!)

SUSANNA
Cor vostro! Cosa avvenne?  (Yours! What happened?)

CHERUBINO
Il Conte ieri  (The Count yesterday,)
perché trovommi sol con Barbarina,  (because I was alone with Barbarina,)
il congedo mi diede;  (gave me leave;)
e se la Contessina,  (and if the Contessina,)
la mia bella comare,  (my beautiful)
grazia non m'intercede, io vado via,  (mistress, thank you, does not intercede, I go away,)
io non ti vedo più, Susanna mia!  (I no longer see you, my Susanna!)

SUSANNA
Non vedete più me! Bravo! Ma dunque  (You do n't see me anymore! Good boy! But is your heart)
non più per la Contessa  (no longer)
secretamente il vostro cor sospira?  (secretly sighingfor the Countess?)

CHERUBINO
Ah, che troppo rispetto ella m'ispira!  (Ah, that too much respect inspires me!)
Felice te, che puoi  (Happy you, that you can)
vederla quando vuoi,  (see her whenever you want,)
che la vesti il mattino,  (thatyoudress her in the morning,)
che la sera la spogli, che le metti  (that you undress her in the evening, that you put on)
gli spilloni, i merletti...  (her pins, laces ...)
Ah, se in tuo loco...  (Ah, if in your place ...)
Cos'hai lì?- Dimmi un poco...  (Whatdoyou have there? - Tell me a little ...)

SUSANNA
Ah, il vago nastro della notturna cuffia  (Ah, the vague ribbon of the nocturnal coif)
di comare sì bella.  (so beautiful.)

CHERUBINO
(toglie il nastro di mano a Susanna)  (takes the ribbon from Susanna's hand)
Deh, dammelo sorella,  (Oh,)
dammelo per pietà!  (give it tome sister,give it to me out of pity!)

SUSANNA
(vuol riprenderglielo)  (wants to take it back)
Presto quel nastro!  (Soon that tape!)

CHERUBINO
(si mette a girare intorno la sedia)  (starts to turn around the chair)
O caro, o bello, o fortunato nastro!  (O dear, or beautiful, or lucky ribbon!)
Io non te'l renderò che colla vita!  (I'll pay you back only with my life!)

SUSANNA
(seguita a corrergli dietro, ma poi s'arresta come fosse stanca)  (continues to run after him, but then stops as if tired)
Cos'è quest'insolenza?  (What is this insolence ?)

CHERUBINO
Eh via, sta cheta!  (Come on, be quiet!)
In ricompensa poi  (As a reward then)
questa mia canzonetta io ti vo' dare.  (this song of mine I want to give you.)

SUSANNA
E che ne debbo fare?  (And what should I do with it?)

CHERUBINO
Leggila alla padrona,  (Read it to the mistress,)
leggila tu medesma;  (read it yourself;)
leggila a Barbarina, a Marcellina;  (read it in Barbarina, in Marcellina;)
leggila ad ogni donna del palazzo!  (read it to every woman in the palace!)

SUSANNA
Povero Cherubin, siete voi pazzo!  (Poor Cherubin, you are crazy!)

N. 6 Aria  (No. 6 Air)

CHERUBINO
Non so più cosa son, cosa faccio,  (I no longer know what I am, what I do,)
or di foco, ora sono di ghiaccio,  (now I am made of ice,)
ogni donna cangiar di colore,  (every woman changes color,)
ogni donna mi fa palpitar.  (every woman makes me palpitate.)
Solo ai nomi d'amor, di diletto,  (Only at the names of love, of delight,)
mi si turba, mi s'altera il petto  (I am troubled, my breast is upset)
e a parlare mi sforza d'amore  (and to speak I strive for love)
un desio ch'io non posso spiegar.  (a desire that I cannot explain.)
Parlo d'amor vegliando,  (I speak of love while watching,)
parlo d'amor sognando,  (I speak of love while dreaming,)
all'acque, all'ombre, ai monti,  (of the)
ai fiori, all'erbe, ai fonti,  (waters, theshadows, the mountains,the flowers, the herbs, the springs, the)
all'eco, all'aria, ai venti,  (echo, the air, the winds,)
che il suon de' vani accenti  (that the sound of vain accents)
portano via con sé.  (take away with them.)
E se non ho chi mi oda,  (And if I have no one who hears me,)
parlo d'amor con me.  (I speak of love with me.)

SCENA VI  (SCENE VI)
Cherubino, Susanna e poi il Conte  (Cherubino, Susanna and then the Count)

Recitativo

CHERUBINO
(vedendo il Conte da lontano, torna indietro impaurito e si nasconde dietro la sedia)  (seeing the Count from a distance, goes back in fear and hides behind the chair)
Ah, son perduto!  (Ah, I am lost!)

SUSANNA
(cerca di mascherar Cherubino)  (tries to disguise Cherubino)
Che timor! - Il Conte! - Misera me!  (What fear! - The Count! - Miserable me!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Susanna, mi sembri  (Susanna, you seem)
agitata e confusa.  (agitated and confused.)

SUSANNA
Signor ... io chiedo scusa ...  (Mr. ... I apologize ...)
ma ... se mai ... qui sorpresa ...  (but ... if anything ... surprise here ...)
per carità! Partite.  (for heaven's sake! Matches.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(si mette a sedere sulla sedia, prende Susanna per la mano)  (sits up in his chair, Susanna takes her hand)
Un momento, e ti lascio,  (One moment, and I leave you,)
odi.  (you hate.)

SUSANNA
Non odo nulla.  (I hear nothing.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Due parole. Tu sai  (Two words. You know)
che ambasciatore a Londra  (what)
il re mi dichiarò; di condur meco  (the king declared to meas ambassador to London; to lead with me)
Figaro destinai.  (Figaro destined.)

SUSANNA
Signor, se osassi ...  (Sir, if you dare ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(sorge)  (rises)
Parla, parla, mia cara, e con quell dritto  (Speak, speak, my dear, and with that straight)
ch'oggi prendi su me finché tu vivi  (ch'oggi take of me as long as you live)
chiedi, imponi, prescrivi.  (you ask, you impose, you prescribe.)

SUSANNA
Lasciatemi signor; dritti non prendo,  (Leave me sir; straight I do not take,)
non ne vo',  (I)
non ne intendo ... oh me infelice!  (do not want, I do not mean ... oh unhappy me!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ah no, Susanna, io ti vo' far felice!  (Oh no, Susanna, I vo 'make happy!)
Tu ben sai quanto io t'amo: a te Basilio  (You well know how much I love you: Basilio has)
tutto già disse. Or senti,  (already said everythingto you. Now listen,)
se per pochi momenti  (if for a few moments with)
meco in giardin sull'imbrunir del giorno ...  (me in the garden at dusk ...)
ah, per questo favore io pagherei ...  (ah, I would pay for this favor ...)

BASILIO
(dentro la scena)  (inside the scene)
È uscito poco fa.  (He came out a little while ago.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Chi parla?  (Who is this?)

SUSANNA
Oh Dei!  (Oh gods!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Esci, e alcun non entri.  (Exit, and does not enter any.)

SUSANNA
Ch'io vi lasci qui solo?  (That I leave you here alone?)

BASILIO
(dentro)  (inside)
Da madama ei sarà, vado a cercarlo.  (From madame he'll be, I'm going to look for him.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(addita la sedia)  (points to the chair)
Qui dietro mi porrò.  (Here I'll get behind.)

SUSANNA
Non vi celate.  (Do not hide.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Taci, e cerca ch'ei parta.  (Shut up, and tries Let him leave.)

SUSANNA  (SUSANNA Alas)
Oimè! Che fate?  (! What are you doing?)

(Il Conte vuol nascondersi dietro il sedile: Susanna si frappone tra il paggio e lui: il Conte la spinge dolcemente. Ella rincula, intanto il paggio passa al davanti del sedile, si mette dentro in piedi, Susanna il ricopre colla vestaglia.)  (The Count wants to hide behind the seat: Susanna stands between the page and him: the Count pushes her gently. She recoils, meanwhile the page passes to the front of the seat, stands up, Susanna covers him with her dressing gown.)

SCENA VII  (SCENE VII)
I suddetti e Basilio  (The above and Basil)

BASILIO
Susanna, il ciel vi salvi. Avreste a caso veduto il Conte?  (Susanna, heaven save you. Would you have seen the Count by chance?)

SUSANNA
E cosa  (And what)
deve far meco il Conte? - Animo, uscite.  (is the Count to do with me? - Soul, go out.)

BASILIO
Aspettate, sentite,  (Wait, listen,)
Figaro di lui cerca.  (Figaro is looking for him.)

SUSANNA
(Oh cielo!) Ei cerca  (Oh dear !) And he looks for)
chi dopo voi più l'odia.  (those who hate him most after you.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(Veggiam come mi serve.)  (Let's see how I need it.)

BASILIO
Io non ho mai nella moral sentito  (I have never heard in morality that)
ch'uno ch'ami la moglie odi il marito.  (someone who loves his wife hates her husband.)
Per dir che il Conte v'ama ...  (To say that the Count loves you ...)

SUSANNA
Sortite, vil ministro  (Sortite, vile minister)
dell'altrui sfrenatezza: Io non ho d'uopo  (of others' wantonness: I don't need)
della vostra morale,  (your morals,)
del Conte, del suo amor ...  (the Count, his love ...)

BASILIO
Non c'è alcun male.  (There is no evil.)
Ha ciascun i suoi gusti: io mi credea  (Each has its own tastes: I thought)
che preferir dovreste per amante,  (you should prefer for a lover,)
come fan tutte quante,  (as they all do,)
un signor liberal, prudente, e saggio,  (a liberal, prudent, and wise gentleman,)
a un giovinastro, a un paggio ...  (to a youngster, to a page ...)

SUSANNA
A Cherubino!  (To Cherubino!)

BASILIO
A Cherubino! A Cherubin d'amore  (A Cherubino! To Cherubin of love)
ch'oggi sul far del giorno  (who)
passeggiava qui d'intorno,  (walked around heretoday at daybreak)
per entrar ...  (to enter ...)

SUSANNA
Uom maligno,  (Malignant man,)
un impostura è questa.  (this is an imposture.)

BASILIO
È un maligno con voi chi ha gli occhi in testa.  (Those who have eyes on their heads are evil with you.)
E quella canzonetta?  (And that song?)
Ditemi in confidenza; io sono amico,  (Tell me in confidence; I am a friend,)
ed altrui nulla dico;  (and of others I say nothing;)
è per voi, per madama ...  (it's for you, for madame ...)

SUSANNA
(Chi diavol gliel'ha detto?)  (Who the hell told you?)

BASILIO
A proposito, figlia,  (By the way, daughter,)
instruitelo meglio;egli la guarda  (instruct him better; he looks)
a tavola sì spesso,  (atherat the table so often,)
e con tale immodestia,  (and with such immodesty,)
che se il Conte s'accorge ... che su tal punto,  (that if the Count realizes ... that on such a point,)
sapete, egli è una bestia.  (you know, he is a beast.)

SUSANNA  (SUSANNA Villain)
Scellerato!  (!)
E perché andate voi  (And why do you go)
tai menzogne spargendo?  (spreading these lies?)

BASILIO
Io! Che ingiustizia! Quel che compro io vendo.  (Me! What an injustice! What I buy I sell.)
A quel che tutti dicono  (To what everyone says)
io non aggiungo un pelo.  (I do not add a hair.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(sortendo)  (beginning to produce)
Come, che dicon tutii!  (How, that speak tutii!)

BASILIO
Oh bella!  (Oh beautiful!)

SUSANNA
Oh cielo!  (Oh dear !)

N. 7 Terzetto  (N. 7 Threesome)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(a Basilio)  (Basilio)
Cosa sento! Tosto andate,  (What do I hear! Go quickly,)
e scacciate il seduttor.  (and cast out the seducer.)

BASILIO
In mal punto son qui giunto,  (I arrived here badly,)
perdonate, oh mio signor.  (forgive me, oh my lord.)

SUSANNA
Che ruina, me meschina,  (What a ruin, me mean,)
(quasi svenuta)  (almost fainted)
son oppressa dal dolor.  (I am oppressed by pain.)

BASILIO ed IL CONTE  (BASILIO and The Count)
(sostenendola)  (supporting her)
Ah già svien la poverina!  (Oh yeah svien the poor!)
Come, oh Dio, le batte il cor!  (How, oh God, her heart beats!)

BASILIO
(approssimandosi al sedile in atto di farla sedere)  (approaching the seat in the act of making her sit)
Pian pianin su questo seggio.  (Slowly on this seat.)

SUSANNA
Dove sono!  (Where am I!)
(rinviene)  (finds)
Cosa veggio!  (What do I see!)
(staccandosi da tutti due)  (breaking away from both of them)
Che insolenza, andate fuor.  (What insolence, go outside.)

BASILIO
Siamo qui per aiutarvi,  (We are here to help you,)
è sicuro il vostro onor.  (your honor is sure.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Siamo qui per aiutarti,  (We are here to help,)
non turbarti, oh mio tesor.  (not to upset you, oh my treasure.)

BASILIO
(al Conte)  (to the Count)
Ah, del paggio quel che ho detto  (Ah, what I said about the page)
era solo un mio sospetto.  (was only my suspicion.)

SUSANNA
È un'insidia, una perfidia,  (It's a trap , a perfidy,)
non credete all'impostor.  (don't believe the impostor .)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Parta, parta il damerino!  (Parta, starts Beau!)

SUSANNA e BASILIO  (SUSANNA and BASILIO)
Poverino!  (Poor thing!)

IL CONTE  (IL CONTE)
Poverino!  (Poverino!)
Ma da me sorpreso ancor.  (Ma da me sorpreso ancor.)

SUSANNA e BASILIO  (SUSANNA e BASILIO)
Come! Che!  (Come! Che!)

IL CONTE  (IL CONTE)
Da tua cugina  (Da tua cugina)
l'uscio ier trovai rinchiuso;  (l'uscio ier trovai rinchiuso;)
picchio, m'apre Barbarina  (picchio, m'apre Barbarina)
paurosa fuor dell'uso.  (paurosa fuor dell'uso.)
Io dal muso insospettito,  (Io dal muso insospettito,)
guardo, cerco in ogni sito,  (guardo, cerco in ogni sito,)
ed alzando pian pianino  (ed alzando pian pianino)
il tappetto al tavolino  (il tappetto al tavolino)
vedo il paggio ...  (vedo il paggio ...)
(imita il gesto colla vestaglia e scopre il paggio)  (imita il gesto colla vestaglia e scopre il paggio)
Ah! cosa veggio!  (Ah! cosa veggio!)

SUSANNA  (SUSANNA)
Ah! crude stelle!  (Ah! crude stelle!)

BASILIO  (BASILIO)
Ah! meglio ancora!  (Ah! meglio ancora!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Onestissima signora!  (virtuous lady!)
Or capisco come va!  (Now I understand how it goes!)

SUSANNA
Accader non può di peggio,  (Accader couldn't be worse,)
giusti Dei! Che mai sarà!  (just Gods! What will it ever be!)

BASILIO
Così fan tutte le belle;  (So do all the beauties ;)
non c'è alcuna novità!  (there is no news!)

Recitativo

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Basilio, in traccia tosto  (Basilio, trace rather)
di Figaro volate:  (than fly Figaro)
(addita Cherubino che non si muove di loco)  (Cherubino points out that it does not move from the spot)
io vo' ch'ei veda ...  (I go 'Let him see ...)

SUSANNA
Ed io che senta; andate!  (And I who hear; go!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Restate: che baldanza! E quale scusa  (Stay: it boldly! And what excuse)
se la colpa è evidente?  (if the fault is evident?)

SUSANNA
Non ha d'uopo di scusa un'innocente.  (An innocent person does not need an excuse.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ma costui quando venne?  (But when he came?)

SUSANNA
Egli era meco  (He was with me)
quando voi qui giungeste, e mi chiedea  (when you came here, and he asked me)
d'impegnar la padrona  (to pledge the mistress)
a intercedergli grazia. Il vostro arrivo  (to intercede for him grace. Your arrival)
in scompiglio lo pose,  (in turmoil put him,)
ed allor in quel loco si nascose.  (and then he hid in that place.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ma s'io stesso m'assisi  (But if I m'assisi same)
quando in camera entrai!  (when I walked in the room!)

CHERUBINO
Ed allor di dietro io mi celai.  (And then I hid myself from behind.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
E quando io là mi posi?  (And when I there, I asked myself?)

CHERUBINO
Allor io pian mi volsi, e qui m'ascosi.  (Then I wept I turned, and here I hid.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(a Susanna)  (Susanna)
Oh ciel, dunque ha sentito  (Heavens, so he heard)
tutto quello ch'io ti dicea!  (all that I was saying to you!)

CHERUBINO
Feci per non sentir quanto potea.  (I tried not to hear what I could.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ah perfidia!  (Ah perfidy!)

BASILIO
Frenatevi: vien gente!  (Stop: come people!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(tira Cherubino giù dalla sedia)  (Cherubino pulls off his chair)
E voi restate qui, picciol serpente!  (And you stay here, Picciol snake!)

SCENA VIII  (SCENE VIII)
Figaro, contadine e contadini, i suddetti  (Figaro, peasants and peasants, the aforementioned)

(Figaro con bianca veste in mano. Coro di contadine e di contadini vestiti di bianco che spargono fiori, raccolti in piccioli panieri, davanti al Conte e cantano il seguente)  (Figaro with white dress in hand. Chorus of peasants and peasants dressed in white who scatter flowers, gathered in small baskets, in front of the Count and sing the following)

N. 8 Coro  (N. 8 Choir)

CORO  (C GOLD)
Giovani liete,  (Happy young people,)
fiori spargete  (scatter flowers)
davanti al nobile  (in front of)
nostro signor.  (ournoblelord.)
Il suo gran core  (Her great heart keeps)
vi serba intatto  (intactthe sweet candor)
d'un più bel fiore  (of a more beautiful flower)
l'almo candor.  (.)

Recitativo

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(a Figaro)  (Figaro)
Cos'è questa commedia?  (What is this comedy?)

FIGARO
(piano a Susanna)
Eccoci in danza:  (softly to Susanna) Here we are in the dance:)
secondami cor mio.  (second me my heart.)

SUSANNA
(Non ci ho speranza.)  (I have no hope.)

FIGARO
Signor, non isdegnate  (Sir, do not disdain)
questo del nostro affetto  (this of our affection)
meritato tributo: or che aboliste  (deserved tribute: now that you abolish such)
un diritto sì ingrato a chi ben ama ...  (an ungrateful right to those who love well ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Quel diritto or non v'è più; cosa si brama?  (That law or there is no more; what do you crave?)

FIGARO
Della vostra saggezza il primo frutto  (Della vostra saggezza il primo frutto)
oggi noi coglierem: le nostre nozze  (Today we will reapthe first fruit of your wisdom: our wedding)
si son già stabilite. Or a voi tocca  (has already been established. Now it is up to you)
costei che un vostro dono  (that an)
illibata serbò, coprir di questa,  (unblemishedgift of yours haskept, to cover with this,)
simbolo d'onestà, candida vesta.  (symbol of honesty, white dress.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(Diabolica astuzia!  (Diabolica wits!)
Ma fingere convien.)  (But needs must pretend.)
Son grato, amici,  (Son thankful, friends,)
ad un senso sì onesto!  (a sense so honest!)
Ma non merto per questo  (But I do not deserve)
né tributi, né lodi; e un dritto ingiusto  (tribute or praisefor this; and an unjust claim)
ne' miei feudi abolendo,  (in my fiefdoms by abolishing,)
a natura, al dover lor dritti io rendo.  (in nature, at having to pay them.)

TUTTI
Evviva, evviva, evviva!  (Hooray, hooray, hooray!)

SUSANNA
Che virtù!  (What a virtue!)

FIGARO
Che giustizia!  (What justice!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(a Figaro e Susanna)  (to Figaro and Susanna)
A voi prometto  (To you I promise)
compier la ceremonia:  (compier the ceremony:)
chiedo sol breve indugio; io voglio in faccia  (ask sol short delay; I want in the face)
de' miei più fidi, e con più ricca pompa  (of my most faithful ones, and with richer pomp to)
rendervi appien felici.  (make you fully happy.)
(Marcellina si trovi.) Andate, amici.  (Marcellina is found.) Go, friends.)

N. 9 Coro  (N. 9 Choir)

CORO  (C GOLD)
Giovani liete,  (Happy young people,)
fiori spargete  (scatter flowers)
davanti al nobile  (in front of)
nostro signor.  (ournoblelord.)
Il suo gran core  (Her great heart keeps)
vi serba intatto  (intactthe sweet candor)
d'un più bel fiore  (of a more beautiful flower)
l'almo candor.  (.)
(partono)  (they leave)

Recitativo

FIGARO, SUSANNA e BASILIO  (F IGARO , SUSANNA and BASILIO)
Evviva!  (Hurray!)

FIGARO
(a Cherubino)  (to Cherubino)
E voi non applaudite?  (And you don't applaud?)

SUSANNA  (SUSANNA The)
È afflitto poveretto!  (poor man is afflicted!)
Perché il padron lo scaccia dal castello!  (Because the master drives him out of the castle!)

FIGARO
Ah, in un giorno sì bello!  (Ah, on such a beautiful day!)

SUSANNA
In un giorno di nozze!  (On a wedding day!)

FIGARO
Quando ognun v'ammira!  (When everyone admires you!)

CHERUBINO
(s'inginocchia)  (kneels)
Perdono, mio signor ...  (Forgiveness, my lord ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Nol meritate.  (do not deserve it.)

SUSANNA
Egli è ancora fanciullo!  (He is still a child!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Men di quel che tu credi.  (Men of what you believe.)

CHERUBINO
È ver, mancai; ma dal mio labbro alfine ...  (It's true, I was missing; but from my lip at last ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(lo alza)  (the stands)
Ben ben; io vi perdono.  (Well well; I forgive you.)
Anzi farò di più; vacante è un posto  (In fact I will do more; vacant is an)
d'uffizial nel reggimento mio;  (official post in my regiment;)
io scelgo voi; partite tosto: addio.  (I choose you; leave quickly: goodbye.)
(Il Conte vuol partire, Susanna e Figaro l'arrestano.)  (The Count wants to leave, Susanna and Figaro arrest him.)

SUSANNA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA and F IGARO)
Ah, fin domani sol ...  (Ah, until tomorrow only ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
No, parta tosto.  (No, starts soon.)

CHERUBINO  (C HERUBIN)
A ubbidirvi, signor, son già disposto.  (To obey you, sir, I am already willing.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Via, per l'ultima volta  (Street, for the last time)
la Susanna abbracciate.  (to embrace Susanna.)
(Inaspettato è il colpo.)  (Unexpected is the blow.)

FIGARO
Ehi, capitano,  (Hey, captain,)
a me pure la mano;  (my hand too;)
(piano a Cherubino)  (softly to Cherubino)
io vo' parlarti  (I want to talk to you)
pria che tu parta. Addio,  (before you leave. Farewell,)
picciolo Cherubino;  (little Cherubino;)
come cangia in un punto il tuo destino.  (how your destiny changes in one place.)

N. 10 Aria  (No. 10 Air)

FIGARO
Non più andrai, farfallone amoroso,  (You will no longer go, amorous butterfly ,)
notte e giorno d'intorno girando;  (night and day turning around;)
delle belle turbando il riposo  (of the beautiful disturbing the rest)
Narcisetto, Adoncino d'amor.  (Narcisetto, Adoncino d'amor.)
Non più avrai questi bei pennacchini,  (You will no longer have these beautiful plumes,)
quel cappello leggero e galante,  (that light and gallant hat,)
quella chioma, quell'aria brillante,  (that hair, that bright air,)
quel vermiglio donnesco color.  (that womanish vermilion color.)
Tra guerrieri, poffar Bacco!  (Among warriors, Poffar Bacchus!)
Gran mustacchi, stretto sacco.  (Great mustache, tight sack.)
Schioppo in spalla, sciabla al fianco,  (Gun on his shoulder, saber at his hip,)
collo dritto, muso franco,  (straight neck, frank muzzle,)
un gran casco, o un gran turbante,  (a large helmet, or a large turban,)
molto onor, poco contante!  (much honor, little cash!)
Ed invece del fandango,  (And instead of the fandango,)
una marcia per il fango.  (a march for mud.)
Per montagne, per valloni,  (For mountains, for valleys,)
con le nevi e i sollioni.  (with snow and soles.)
Al concerto di tromboni,  (At the concert of trombones,)
di bombarde, di cannoni,  (bombards, cannons,)
che le palle in tutti i tuoni  (that the balls)
all'orecchio fan fischiar.  (whistle in all the thunder in the ear.)
Cherubino alla vittoria:  (Cherub to victory:)
alla gloria militar.  (to military glory.)
(Partono tutti alla militare.)  (They all leave for the military.)

Atto primo  (Act one)
Atto secondo  (Act two)
Atto terzo  (Act three)
Atto quarto  (Act four)

ATTO SECONDO  (SECOND ACT)
Camera ricca con alcova e tre porte  (Rich room with alcove and three doors)

SCENA I  (SCENE I)
La Contessa sola: poi Susanna e poi Figaro  (The Countess alone: ​​then Susanna and then Figaro)

N. 11. Cavatina  (No. 11. Cavatina)

LA CONTESSA
Porgi, amor, qualche ristoro  (Grant, love, some)
al mio duolo, a' miei sospir.  (relief to my sorrow, in 'my sighs.)
O mi rendi il mio tesoro,  (Either you make me my treasure,)
o mi lascia almen morir.  (or you at least let me die.)

Recitativo

LA CONTESSA
Vieni, cara Susanna,  (Come, dear Susanna,)
finiscimi l'istoria!  (finiscimi the story!)

SUSANNA
(entra)  (enters)
È già finita.  (It's already over.)

LA CONTESSA
Dunque volle sedurti?  (So he wanted to seduce you?)

SUSANNA
Oh, il signor Conte  (Oh, the Count)
non fa tai complimenti  (does not pay such compliments to)
colle donne mie pari;  (my equal women;)
egli venne a contratto di danari.  (he came to contract of money.)

LA CONTESSA
Ah, il crudel più non m'ama!  (Ah, the cruel no longer loves me!)

SUSANNA
E come poi  (And how)
è geloso di voi?  (is he jealous of you?)

LA CONTESSA
Come lo sono  (As are)
i moderni mariti: per sistema  (the modern husbands system for)
infedeli, per genio capricciosi,  (unbelievers, for capricious genius,)
e per orgoglio poi tutti gelosi.  (and then all jealous pride.)
Ma se Figaro t'ama ... ei sol potria ...  (But if Figaro loves you ... and the sol can ...)

FIGARO
(cantando entro la scena)  (singing within the stage)
La la la ...  (La la la ...)

SUSANNA
Eccolo: vieni, amico.  (Here it is: come, friend.)
Madama impaziente ...  (Impatient Madam ...)

FIGARO
A voi non tocca  (You don't)
stare in pena per questo.  (have to worry about this.)
Alfin di che si tratta? Al signor Conte  (At least what is it? Signor Conte)
piace la sposa mia,  (likes my wife, so)
indi segretamente  (secretly he will want to)
ricuperar vorria  (recover)
il diritto feudale.  (the feudal right.)
Possibile è la cosa, e naturale.  (Possible is the thing, and natural.)

LA CONTESSA
Possibil!  (Possibil!)

SUSANNA
Naturale!  (Natural!)

FIGARO  (F IGARO Extremely)
Naturalissima.  (natural.)
E se Susanna vuol possibilissima.  (And if Susanna wants it very possible.)

SUSANNA  (SUSANNA Stop)
Finiscila una volta.  (it once.)

FIGARO
Ho già finito.  (I have already finished.)
Quindi prese il partito  (Then he took the)
di sceglier me corriero, e la Susanna  (step of choosing me as a courier, and Susanna was)
consigliera segreta d'ambasciata.  (the secret adviser of the embassy.)
E perch'ella ostinata ognor rifiuta  (And because she stubbornly refuses)
il diploma d'onor ch'ei le destina  (the diploma of honor which he assigns to her, he)
minaccia di protegger Marcellina.  (threatens to protect Marcellina.)
Questo è tutto l'affare.  (This is the whole deal.)

SUSANNA
Ed hai coraggio di trattar scherzando  (And do you have the courage to jokingly treat such)
un negozio sì serio?  (a serious shop?)

FIGARO  (F IGARO Is)
Non vi basta  (n't it enough)
che scherzando io ci pensi? Ecco il progetto:  (for you to think about it jokingly? Here is the project:)
per Basilio un biglietto  (for Basilio a note)
io gli fi capitar che l'avvertisca  (will happen to him that he)
di certo appuntamento  (certainlywarns herof an appointment)
(alla Contessa)  (to the Countess)
che per l'ora del ballo  (that)
a un amante voi deste ...  (you gave to a lover atthe time of the ball...)

LA CONTESSA
O ciel! Che sento!  (Heavens! What do I hear!)
Ad un uom sì geloso! ...  (To such a jealous man! ...)

FIGARO
Ancora meglio.  (Even better.)
Così potrem più presto imbarazzarlo,  (Thus we will soon be able to embarrass him,)
confonderlo, imbrogliarlo,  (confuse him, cheat him,)
rovesciargli i progetti,  (overturn his plans,)
empierlo di sospetti, e porgli in testa  (fill him with suspicions, and put it in his head)
che la moderna festa  (that the modern feast)
ch'ei di fare a me tenta altri a lui faccia;  (you are giving me tempts others to make him;)
onde qua perda il tempo, ivi la traccia.  (so that here it loses time, there the trace.)
Così quasi ex abrupto, e senza ch'abbia  (So almost abruptly, and without having)
fatto per frastonarci alcun disegno  (done any design to confuse us,)
vien l'ora delle nozze, e in faccia a lei  (the hour of the wedding comes, and in front of her)
(segnando la Contessa)  (marking the Countess) it will)
non fia, ch'osi d'opporsi ai voti miei.  (not be that you dare oppose my vows.)

SUSANNA
È ver, ma in di lui vece  (It is true, but)
s'opporrà Marcellina.  (Marcellina will opposehim instead.)

FIGARO
Aspetta: al Conte  (Wait:)
farai subito dir, che verso sera  (you will immediately tell theCountthat in the evening you)
attendati in giardino,  (wait in the garden,)
il picciol Cherubino  (the little Cherubino)
per mio consiglio non ancora partito  (for my advice has not yet left)
da femmina vestito,  (dressed as a female,)
faremo che in sua vece ivi sen vada.  (we will arrange for him to go there in his place.)
Questa è l'unica strada  (This is the only way)
onde monsù sorpreso da madama  (where monsù surprised by madame)
sia costretto a far poi quel che si brama.  (is forced to do what he craves.)

LA CONTESSA
(a Susanna)  (Susanna)
Che ti par?  (What do you think?)

SUSANNA
Non c'è mal.  (There is no pain.)

LA CONTESSA
Nel nostro caso ...  (In our case ...)

SUSANNA
Quand'egli è persuaso ... e dove è il tempo?  (When is he persuaded ... and where is the time?)

FIGARO
Ito è il Conte alla caccia; e per qualch'ora  (Ito is the Count on the hunt; and for a few hours)
non sarà di ritorno; io vado e tosto  (he won't be back; I go and soon)
Cherubino vi mando; lascio a voi  (Cherubino I send you; I leave it to you)
la cura di vestirlo.  (to dress it up.)

LA CONTESSA
E poi? ...  (And then? ...)

FIGARO
E poi ...  (And then ...)
Se vuol ballare  (If you want to dance)
signor Contino,  (Signor Contino, I'll play)
il chitarrino  (the little guitar)
le suonerò.  (.)
(parte)  (part)

SCENA II  (SCENE II)
La Contessa, Susanna, poi Cherubino  (The Countess, Susanna, then Cherubino)

Recitativo

LA CONTESSA
Quanto duolmi, Susanna,  (How it grieves me, Susanna,)
che questo giovinotto abbia del Conte  (that this young man has the Count)
le stravaganze udite! Ah tu non sai! ...  (extravagance hear! Ah you don't know! ...)
Ma per qual causa mai  (But for what cause did he not come)
Da me stessa ei non venne? ...  (from myself? ...)
Dov'è la canzonetta?  (Where's the song?)

SUSANNA
Eccola: appunto  (Here it is: let's just)
facciam che ce la canti.  (let us sing it.)
Zitto, vien gente! È desso: avanti, avanti,  (Shut up, come people! That's it: go on, go on,)
signor uffiziale.  (mister officer.)

CHERUBINO
Ah, non chiamarmi  (Ah, do not call me)
con nome sì fatale! Ei mi rammenta  (by such a fatal name! He reminds me)
che abbandonar degg'io  (that to leave my dear)
comare tanto buona ...  (friend so good ...)

SUSANNA
E tanto bella!  (And so beautiful!)

CHERUBINO
Ah sì ... certo ...  (Ah yes ... of course ...)

SUSANNA
Ah sì ... certo ...Ipocritone!  (Ah yes ... of course ... Hypocritone!)
Via presto la canzone  (Soon the song)
che stamane a me deste  (that you gave me this morning)
a madama cantate.  (to madame sang away.)

LA CONTESSA
Chi n'è l'autor?  (Who's something the author?)

SUSANNA
(additando Cherubino)  (pointing to Cherubino)
Guardate: egli ha due braccia  (Look: he has two arms)
di rossor sulla faccia.  (of red on his face.)

LA CONTESSA
Prendi la mia chitarra, e l'accompagna.  (Take my guitar, and accompanies it.)

CHERUBINO
Io sono sì tremante ...  (Yes, I am trembling ...)
ma se madama vuole ...  (but if madam wants ...)

SUSANNA
Lo vuole, sì, lo vuol. Manco parole.  (He wants it, yes, he does. I miss words.)

N. 12. Arietta  (No. 12. Arietta)

CHERUBINO
Voi che sapete  (You who know)
che cosa è amor,  (what love is,)
donne, vedete  (women, see if)
s'io l'ho nel cor.  (I have it in my heart.)
Quello ch'io provo  (What I feel)
vi ridirò,  (,Iwill say again,)
è per me nuovo,  (is new to me,)
capir nol so.  (I do not understand.)
Sento un affetto  (I feel an affection)
pien di desir,  (full of desir,)
ch'ora è diletto,  (which is now delight,)
ch'ora è martir.  (which is now martyr.)
Gelo e poi sento  (I freeze and then I feel)
l'alma avvampar,  (the soul flare up,)
e in un momento  (and in a moment)
torno a gelar.  (I go back to freezing.)
Ricerco un bene  (I am looking for a good)
fuori di me,  (outside of myself,)
non so chi'l tiene,  (I don't know who holds it,)
non so cos'è.  (I don't know what it is.)
Sospiro e gemo  (I sigh and moan)
senza voler,  (without wanting to, I)
palpito e tremo  (throb and tremble)
senza saper.  (without knowing.)
Non trovo pace  (I find no peace)
notte né dì,  (night or day,)
ma pur mi piace  (but still I like to)
languir così.  (languishlikethis.)
Voi che sapete  (You who know)
che cosa è amor,  (what love is,)
donne, vedete  (women, see if)
s'io l'ho nel cor.  (I have it in my heart.)

Recitativo

LA CONTESSA
Bravo! Che bella voce! Io non sapea  (Bravo! What a beautiful voice! I didn't know)
che cantaste sì bene.  (you sang so well.)

SUSANNA
Oh, in verità  (Oh, verily)
egli fa tutto ben quello ch'ei fa.  (he does everything well what he does.)
Presto a noi, bel soldato.  (Soon to us, handsome soldier.)
Figaro v'informò ...  (Figaro informed you ...)

CHERUBINO  (CHERUBINO He)
Tutto mi disse.  (told me everything.)

SUSANNA
(si misura con Cherubino)  (measuring herself with Cherubino)
Lasciatemi veder. Andrà benissimo!  (Let me see. It will be great!)
Siam d'uguale statura ... giù quel manto.  (We are of equal height ... down that cloak.)
(gli cava il manto)  (takes out his mantle)

LA CONTESSA
Che fai?  (What are you doing?)

SUSANNA  (SUSANNA Don't)
Niente paura.  (worry.)

LA CONTESSA  (LA CONTESSA)
E se qualcuno entrasse?  (E se qualcuno entrasse?)

SUSANNA  (SUSANNA)
Entri, che mal facciamo?  (Entri, che mal facciamo?)
La porta chiuderò.  (La porta chiuderò.)
(chiude la porta)  (chiude la porta)
Ma come poi  (Ma come poi)
acconciargli i cappelli?  (acconciargli i cappelli?)

LA CONTESSA  (LA CONTESSA)
Una mia cuffia  (Una mia cuffia)
prendi nel gabinetto.  (prendi nel gabinetto.)
Presto!  (Presto!)
(Susanna va nel gabinetto a pigliar una cuffia:  (Susanna va nel gabinetto a pigliar una cuffia:)
Cherubino si accosta alla Contessa, e gli lascia veder la patente che terrà in petto:  (Cherubino si accosta alla Contessa, e gli lascia veder la patente che terrà in petto:)
la Contessa la prende, l'apre: e vede che manca il sigillo.)  (la Contessa la prende, l'apre: e vede che manca il sigillo.)
Che carta è quella?  (Che carta è quella?)

CHERUBINO  (CHERUBINO)
La patente.  (La patente.)

LA CONTESSA  (LA CONTESSA)
Che sollecita gente!  (Che sollecita gente!)

CHERUBINO  (CHERUBINO)
L'ebbi or da Basilio.  (L'ebbi or da Basilio.)

LA CONTESSA  (LA CONTESSA)
(gliela rende)  (gliela rende)
Dalla fretta obliato hanno il sigillo.  (Dalla fretta obliato hanno il sigillo.)

SUSANNA  (SUSANNA)
(sorte)  (sorte)
Il sigillo di che?  (Il sigillo di che?)

LA CONTESSA  (LA CONTESSA)
Della patente.  (Della patente.)

SUSANNA  (SUSANNA)
Cospetto! Che premura!  (Cospetto! Che premura!)
Ecco la cuffia.  (Ecco la cuffia.)

LA CONTESSA  (LA CONTESSA)
Spicciati: va bene!  (Spicciati: va bene!)
Miserabili noi, se il Conte viene.  (Miserabili noi, se il Conte viene.)

N. 13. Aria  (N. 13. Aria)

SUSANNA
Venite, inginocchiatevi;  (Come, kneel;)
(prende Cherubino e se lo fa inginocchiare  (takes Cherubino and makes him kneel)
davanti poco discosto dalla Contessa che siede)  (in front of him not far from the Contessa who is sitting)
Restate fermo lì.  (Stay still there.)
(lo pettina da un lato, poi lo prende pel mento  (he combs it to one side, then takes it by the chin)
e lo volge a suo piacere)  (and turns it as he pleases)
Pian piano, or via, giratevi:  (Little by little, now, turn around:)
Bravo, va ben così.  (Bravo, that's okay.)
(Cherubino, mentre Susanna lo sta acconciando  (Cherubino, while Susanna is)
guarda la Contessa teneramente.)  (guarda la Contessa teneramente.)
La faccia ora volgetemi:  (teasing him, looks at the Countess tenderly.) Now turn)
Olà, quegli occhi a me.  (to me: Hola, those eyes to me.)
(seguita ad acconciarlo ed a porgli la cuffia)  (continues to style him and to put the cap on)
Drittissimo: guardatemi.  (Very straight: look at me.)
Madama qui non è.  (Madame is not here.)
Restate fermo, or via,  (Stay still, now go,)
giratevi, bravo!  (turn around, bravo!)
Più alto quel colletto ...  (The higher that collar ...)
quel ciglio un po' più basso ...  (that slightly lower eyelash ...)
le mani sotto il petto ...  (hands under the chest ...)
vedremo poscia il passo  (we will see the step later)
quando sarete in pie'.  (when you are at your feet.)
(piano alla Contessa)  (softly to the Countess)
Mirate il bricconcello!  (Aim the rascal!)
Mirate quanto è bello!  (Behold how beautiful it is!)
Che furba guardatura!  (What a clever look!)
Che vezzo, che figura!  (What a habit, what a figure!)
Se l'amano le femmine  (If females love him, they)
han certo il lor perché.  (certainly have their why.)

Recitativo

LA CONTESSA
Quante buffonerie!  (How many antics!)

SUSANNA
Ma se ne sono  (But if I)
io medesma gelosa; ehi, serpentello,  (myself am jealous; hey, little snake,)
volete tralasciar d'esser sì bello!  (you want to leave out being so beautiful!)

LA CONTESSA
Finiam le ragazzate: or quelle maniche  (Let 's wind the pranks: or those sleeves)
oltre il gomito gli alza,  (over his elbow up,)
onde più agiatamente  (more comfortably order)
l'abito gli si adatti.  (the gown fits.)

SUSANNA
(eseguisce)  (executes)
Ecco.  (Here.)

LA CONTESSA
Più indietro.  (Further back.)
Così.  (Like this.)
(scoprendo un nastro, onde ha fasciato il braccio)  (Uncovering a ribbon, whence he wrapped his arm)
Che nastro è quello?  (What ribbon is that?)

SUSANNA
È quel ch'esso involommi.  (That's what it involves.)

LA CONTESSA
E questo sangue?  (And this blood?)

CHERUBINO
Quel sangue ... io non so come ...  (That blood ... I don't know how ...)
poco pria sdrucciolando ...  (just before slipping ...)
in un sasso... la pelle io mi graffiai...  (in a stone ... I scratched my skin ...)
e la piaga col nastro io mi fasciai.  (andI bandagedthe wound with the tape.)

SUSANNA
Mostrate! Non è mal. Cospetto! Ha il braccio  (Show it! It is not bad. I guess! His arm is)
più candido del mio! Qualche ragazza...  (whiter than mine! Some girl...)

LA CONTESSA
E segui a far la pazza?  (And follow to make crazy?)
Va nel mio gabinettto, e prendi un poco  (Go to my toilet, and take a little)
d'inglese taffetà: ch'è sullo scrigno:  (English taffeta: which is on the casket:)
(Susanna parte in fretta)  (Susanna leaves quickly)
In quanto al nastro... inver... per il colore  (As for the ribbon ... inver ... for the color)
mi spiacea di privarmene.  (I'm sorry to deprive myself of it.)

SUSANNA
(entra e le dà il taffetà e le forbici)  (enters and gives her the taffeta and the scissors) Here)
Tenete,  (, what about)
e da legargli il braccio?  (tying his arm?)

LA CONTESSA
Un altro nastro  (Another tape)
prendi insieme col mio vestito.  (get together with my dress.)

CHERUBINO
Ah, più presto m'avria quello guarito!  (Ah, the cured one will have me sooner!)
(Susanna parte per la porta ch'è in fondo  (Susanna leaves for the door at the end)
e porta seco il mantello di Cherubino.)  (and carries Cherubino's cloak with her.)

LA CONTESSA
Perché? Questo è migliore!  (Why? This is better!)

CHERUBINO
Allor che un nastro...  (When a ribbon ...)
legò la chioma... ovver toccò la pelle...  (tied the hair ... or touched the skin ...)
d'oggetto...  (of an object ...)

LA CONTESSA
...forastiero,  (... forastiero,)
è buon per le ferite! Non è vero?  (is good for wounds! It's not true?)
Guardate qualità ch'io non sapea!  (Look at qualities that I did not know!)

CHERUBINO
Madama scherza; ed io frattanto parto..  (Madame jokes; and in the meantime I leave ..)

LA CONTESSA
Poverin! Che sventura!  (Poverin! What a misfortune!)

CHERUBINO
Oh, me infelice!  (Oh, unhappy me!)

LA CONTESSA
Or piange...  (Or weeps ...)

CHERUBINO
Oh ciel! Perché morir non lice!  (Oh heaven! Why dying is not lawful!)
Forse vicino all'ultimo momento...  (Perhaps close to the last moment ...)
questa bocca oseria!  (this mouth hovering!)

LA CONTESSA
Siate saggio; cos'è questa follia?  (Be wise; what is this madness?)
(si sente picchiare alla porta.)  (There is a knock on the door.)
Chi picchia alla mia porta?  (Who knocks on my door?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(fuori della porta)  (outside the door)
Perché è chiusa?  (Why is it closed?)

LA CONTESSA
Il mio sposo, oh Dei! Son morta!  (My husband, oh gods! I am dead!)
Voi qui senza mantello!  (You here without a cloak!)
In quello stato! Un ricevuto foglio...  (In that state! A sheet received ...)
la sua gran gelosia!  (his great jealousy!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Cosa indugiate?  (What delay?)

LA CONTESSA
Son sola... anzi son sola...  (Son alone ... I am indeed alone ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
E a chi parlate?  (And to whom you speak?)

LA CONTESSA
A voi... certo... a voi stesso...  (yours ... of course ... to yourself ...)

CHERUBINO
Dopo quel ch'è successo, il suo furore...  (After what has happened, his fury ...)
non trovo altro consiglio!  (I find no other advice!)
(entra nel gabinetto e chiude)  (enters the toilet and closes)

LA CONTESSA
(prende la chiave)  (takes the key)
Ah, mi difenda il cielo in tal periglio!  (Ah, I defend the sky in such peril!)
(corre ad aprire al Conte)  (runs to open to the Count)

SCENA III  (SCENE III)
La Contessa ed il Conte da cacciatore  (The Countess and the Count as a hunter)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Che novità! Non fu mai vostra usanza  (What's new? It was never your custom)
di rinchiudervi in stanza!  (to lock yourself in your room!)

LA CONTESSA
È ver; ma io...  (is ver; but I ...)
io stava qui mettendo...  (I was here putting ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Via, mettendo...  (Street, putting ...)

LA CONTESSA
... certe robe...era meco la Susanna ...  (... some stuff ... Susanna was with me ...)
che in sua camera è andata.  (that went into his room.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ad ogni modo  (However)
voi non siete tranquilla.  (you are not quiet.)
Guardate questo foglio!  (Look at this sheet!)

LA CONTESSA
(Numi! È il foglio  (gods! It's the paper)
che Figaro gli scrisse...)  (that Figaro wrote him ...)
(Cherubino fa cadere un tavolino, ed una sedia in gabinetto,  (Cherubino knocks over a table, and a chair in the cabinet,)
con molto strepito.)  (with a lot of noise.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Cos'è codesto strepito?  (What Codest noise? Something has fallen into the)
In gabinetto  (toilet)
qualche cosa è caduta.  (.)

LA CONTESSA
Io non intesi niente.  (I heard nothing.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Convien che abbiate i gran pensieri in mente.  (behooves you have the great thoughts in mind.)

LA CONTESSA
Di che?  (What?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Là v'è qualchuno.  (there some one there.)

LA CONTESSA
Chi volete che sia?  (Who want it?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Io chiedo a voi.  (I ask you.)
Io vengo in questo punto  (I come to this point)

LA CONTESSA
Ah sì, Susanna ... appunto...  (Ah yes, Susanna ... in fact ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Che passò mi diceste alla sua stanza!  (What came to tell me to his room!)

LA CONTESSA
Alla sua stanza, o qui - non vidi bene...  (To her room, or here - I did not notice ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Susanna! - E donde viene  (Susanna! - And where does it come from)
che siete sì turbata?  (that you are so disturbed?)

LA CONTESSA
Per la mia cameriera?  (To my maid?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Io non so nulla;  (I know nothing;)
ma turbata senz'altro.  (but certainly upset.)

LA CONTESSA
Ah, questa serva  (Ah, this takes place for)
più che non turba me turba voi stesso.  (more that troubles me not upset yourself.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
È vero, è vero, e lo vedrete adesso.  (is true, it is true, and you will see now.)
(La Susanna entra per la porta ond'è uscita,  (Susanna enters through the door she came out of,)
e si ferma vedendo il Conte, che dalla porta del gabinetto sta favellando.)  (and stops when she sees the Count, who is speaking from the toilet door.)

N. 14. Terzetto  (No. 14. Threesome)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Susanna, or via, sortite,  (Susanna, or via, sorties,)
sortite, io così vo'.  (sorties, so I vo '.)

LA CONTESSA
Fermatevi... sentite...  (Stop ... listen ...)
Sortire ella non può.  (She can not come.)

SUSANNA
Cos'è codesta lite!  (What is this quarrel!)
Il paggio dove andò!  (Where did the page go!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
E chi vietarlo or osa?  (And who dares to forbid?)

LA CONTESSA
Lo vieta l'onestà.  (forbids honesty.)
Un abito da sposa  (A wedding dress)
provando ella si sta.  (she is trying on.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Chiarissima è la cosa:  (Chiarissima's the thing:)
l'amante qui sarà.  (the lover will be here.)

LA CONTESSA
Bruttissima è la cosa,  (An ugly is the thing,)
chi sa cosa sarà.  (who knows what will be.)

SUSANNA
Capisco qualche cosa,  (I understand something, let's)
veggiamo come va.  (see how it goes.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Dunque parlate almeno.  (So at least speak.)
Susanna, se qui siete...  (Susanna, if you are here ...)

LA CONTESSA
Nemmen, nemmen, nemmeno,  (Nemmen, nemmen, even,)
io v'ordino: tacete.  (I order you: shut up.)
(Susanna si nasconde entro l'alcova.)  (Susanna hides in the alcove.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Consorte mia, giudizio,  (My wife, be,)
un scandalo, un disordine,  (a scandal, an uproar,)
schiviam per carità!  (avoided, we beg!)

SUSANNA
Oh cielo, un precipizio,  (Oh dear , a precipice,)
un scandalo, un disordine,  (a scandal, a disorder,)
qui certo nascerà.  (will certainly be born here.)

LA CONTESSA
Consorte mio, giudizio,  (My Lord, are,)
un scandalo, un disordine,  (a scandal, an uproar,)
schiviam per carità!  (avoided, we beg!)

Recitativo

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Dunque voi non aprite?  (So you do not open?)

LA CONTESSA
E perché degg'io  (And why must I)
le mie camere aprir?  (my open his room?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ebben, lasciate,  (Ebben, let,)
l'aprirem senza chiavi. Ehi, gente!  (the'll open it without a key. Hey, folks!)

LA CONTESSA
Come?  (How?)
Porreste a repentaglio  (Would you jeopardize)
d'una dama l'onore?  (a lady's honor?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
È vero, io sbaglio.  (It's true, I'm wrong.)
Posso senza rumore,  (I can, without noise,)
senza scandalo alcun di nostra gente  (without scandal, any of our people)
andar io stesso a prender l'occorrente.  (go and get what is needed myself.)
Attendete pur qui, ma perché in tutto  (Wait here too, but so that)
sia il mio dubbio distrutto anco le porte  (my doubt is destroyedin everything,even the doors)
io prima chiuderò.  (I will close first.)
(chiude a chiave la porta che conduce alle stanze delle cameriere)  (locks the door leading to the maids' rooms)

LA CONTESSA
(Che imprudenza!)  (What imprudence!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Voi la condiscendenza  (you the condescension)
di venir meco avrete.  (of you come with me.)
Madama, eccovi il braccio, andiamo.  (Madame, here's your arm, let's go.)

LA CONTESSA
Andiamo.  (Let's go.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Susanna starà qui finché torniamo.  (Susanna will stay here until we get back.)
(Partono.)  (They leave.)

SCENA IV  (SCENE IV)
Susanna e Cherubino  (Susanna and Cherubino)

N. 15. Duettino  (N. 15. Duettino)

SUSANNA
(uscendo dall'alcova in fretta; alla porta del gabinetto)
Aprite, presto, aprite;  (hurrying out of the alcove ; to the toilet door) Open, quick, open;)
aprite, è la Susanna.  (open, it's Susanna.)
Sortite, via sortite,  (Sorties, sorties,)
andate via di qua.  (go away from here.)

CHERUBINO  (CHERUBINO Alas)
Oimè, che scena orribile!  (, what a horrible scene!)
Che gran fatalità!  (What a great fatality!)

SUSANNA
Partite, non tardate  (Leave, do not delay)
(accostandosi or ad una, or ad un'altra porta)  (now approaching one, now another door)
di qua, di là.  (from here, there.)
(Cherubino accostandosi or ad una, or ad un'altra porta)  (Cherubino approaching one, now another door)

SUSANNA e CHERUBINO  (SUSANNA and CHERUBINO)
Le porte son serrate,  (The doors are locked,)
che mai, che mai sarà!  (what ever, what ever will be!)

CHERUBINO
Qui perdersi non giova.  (Getting lost here doesn't help.)

SUSANNA
V'uccide se vi trova.  (He kills you if he finds you.)

CHERUBINO
(affacciandosi alla finestra)  (looking out the window)
Veggiamo un po' qui fuori.  (Let's see a little out here.)
Dà proprio nel giardino.  (Gives right into the garden.)
(facendo moto di saltar giù)  (making motion to jump off)

SUSANNA
(trattenendolo)  (holding him back)
Fermate, Cherubino!  (Stop, Cherubino!)
Fermate per pietà!  (Stop for pity!)

CHERUBINO
(tornando a guardare)  (looking back)
Un vaso o due di fiori,  (A vase or two of flowers, the)
più mal non avverrà.  (more ill will not happen.)

SUSANNA
(trattenendolo sempre)  (always holding him back)
Tropp'alto per un salto,  (Too high for a jump,)
fermate per pietà!  (stop for pity!)

CHERUBINO
(si scioglie)  (melts)
Lasciami, pria di nuocerle  (Leave me, before harming them)
nel fuoco volerei.  (in the fire I would fly.)
Abbraccio te per lei -  (I hug you for her -)
addio, così si fa.  (goodbye, so do you.)
(salta fuori)  (jump out)

SUSANNA  (SUSANNA He is)
Ei va a perire, oh Dei!  (going to perish, oh Gods!)
Fermate per pietà; fermate!  (Stop for pity; stop!)

Recitativo

SUSANNA
Oh, guarda il demonietto! Come fugge!  (Oh, look at the little devil! How he escapes!)
È già un miglio lontano.  (It's already a mile away.)
Ma non perdiamoci invano.  (But let's not get lost in vain.)
Entriam nel gabinetto,  (Let's go into the lavatory,)
venga poi lo smargiasso, io qui l'aspetto.  (then come the braggart, I'll wait here.)
(entra in gabinetto e si chiude dietro la porta)  (enters the toilet and closes behind the door)

SCENA V  (SCENE V)
La Contessa, il Conte con martello e tenaglia in mano;  (The Countess, the Count with hammer and pincer in hand;)
al suo arrivo esamina tutte le porte.  (upon his arrival he examines all the doors.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Tutto è come il lasciai: volete dunque  (Everything is like the left: so you want to)
aprir voi stessa, o deggio...  (open his yourself, or must I ...)

LA CONTESSA
Ahimé, fermate;  (Alas, stops;)
e ascoltatemi un poco.  (and listen to me a little.)
Mi credete capace  (Do you believe me capable)
di mancar al dover?  (of failing to have to?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Come vi piace.  (As You Like It. I'll see who is locked into)
Entro quel gabinetto  (that toilet)
chi v'è chiuso vedrò.  (.)

LA CONTESSA
Sì, lo vedrete...  (Yes, I see ...)
Ma uditemi tranquillo.  (But listen to me calmly.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Non è dunque Susanna!  (It is not Susanna!)

LA CONTESSA
No, ma invece è un oggetto  (No, but instead is an object)
che ragion di sospetto  (that the reason of suspicion)
non vi deve lasciar. Per questa sera...  (there must leave. For this evening ...)
una burla innocente...  (an innocent joke ...)
di far si disponeva... ed io vi giuro...  (to make arrangements ... and I swear to you ...)
che l'onor... l'onestà...  (that honor ... honesty ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Chi è dunque! Dite...  (Who then! You say ...)
l'ucciderò.  (I will kill him.)

LA CONTESSA
Sentite!  (Look!)
Ah, non ho cor!  (Ah, I have no heart!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Parlate.  (Talk.)

LA CONTESSA
È un fanciullo...  (It's a boy ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Un fanciul!...  (A fanciul! ...)

LA CONTESSA
Sì... Cherubino ...  (Yes ... Cherubino ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(E mi farà il destino  (And I will destiny)
ritrovar questo paggio in ogni loco!)  (find again this page in every spot!)
Come? Non è partito? Scellerati!  (How? Hasn't he left? Villains!)
Ecco i dubbi spiegati, ecco l'imbroglio,  (Here are the doubts explained, here is the trick,)
ecco il raggiro, onde m'avverte il foglio.  (here is the trick, from which the sheet warns me.)

SCENA VI  (SCENE VI)
La Contessa ed il Conte  (The Countess and the Count)

N. 16. Finale  (N. 16. Final)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(alla porta del gabinetto)  (at the cabinet door)
Esci omai, garzon malnato,  (Exit omai, garzon miscreated,)
sciagurato, non tardar.  (unfortunate, do not delay.)

LA CONTESSA
Ah, signore, quel furore  (Ah, sir, your anger)
per lui fammi il cor tremar.  (for him my heart tremble.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
E d'opporvi ancor osate?  (And of even dare oppose?)

LA CONTESSA
No, sentite...  (No, listen ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Via parlate.  (Via spoken.)

LA CONTESSA
Giuro al ciel ch'ogni sospetto...  (I swear by Heaven that every suspicion ...)
e lo stato in che il trovate...  (and the state in which you'll find ...)
sciolto il collo... nudo il petto...  (his collar loosened ... naked chest ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Sciolto il collo!  (Loose neck!)
Nudo il petto! Seguitate!  (Naked chest! Follow on!)

LA CONTESSA
Per vestir femminee spoglie...  (To clothe feminine guise ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ah comprendo, indegna moglie,  (Ah understand, worthless woman,)
mi vo' tosto vendicar.  (I vo 'soon get my revenge.)

LA CONTESSA
Mi fa torto quel trasporto,  (I do wrong that transport,)
m'oltraggiate a dubitar.  (m'oltraggiate to doubt.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Qua la chiave!  (me the key!)

LA CONTESSA
Egli è innocente.  (He is innocent.)
(dandogli la chiave)  (giving him the key)
Voi sapete...  (You know ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Non so niente.  (I know nothing.)
Va lontan dagl'occhi miei,  (Go away from my)
un'infida, un'empia sei  (eyes, you are a treacherous, animpious one,)
e mi cerchi d'infamar.  (and you try to infirm me.)

LA CONTESSA
Vado... sì... ma...  (I go ... yes ... but ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Non ascolto.  (not listen.)

LA CONTESSA
Non son rea.  (am not guilty.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Vel leggo in volto!  (I read it in your face!)
Mora, mora, e più non sia,  (Blackberry, blackberry, and more may not be, it is the)
ria cagion del mio penar.  (cause of my penar.)

LA CONTESSA
Ah, la cieca gelosia  (Ah, blind jealousy)
qualche eccesso gli fa far.  (some excesses he brings.)

SCENA VII  (SCENE VII)
I suddetti e Susanna  (The above and Susanna)

(Il Conte apre il gabinetto e Susanna esce sulla porta, ed ivi si ferma.)  (The Count opens the toilet and Susanna goes out to the door, and stops there.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Susanna!  (Susanna!)

LA CONTESSA
Susanna!  (Susanna!)

SUSANNA
Signore,  (Sir,)
cos'è quel stupore?  (what is that astonishment?)
Il brando prendete,  (The brando take,)
il paggio uccidete,  (the page kill,)
quel paggio malnato,  (that)
vedetelo qua.  (ill-bornpage,see it here.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(Che scola! La testa  (What a drain !)
girando mi va.)  (I feel like turning myhead.)

LA CONTESSA
(Che storia è mai questa,  (What story is this,)
Susanna v'è là.)  (Susanna there is there.)

SUSANNA
(Confusa han la testa,  (Confused they have their heads, they)
non san come va.)  (don't know how it goes.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Sei sola?  (Are you alone?)

SUSANNA
Guardate,  (Look,)
qui ascoso sarà.  (here he will be hidden.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Guardiamo, qui ascoso sarà.  ('ll look, someone will.)
(entra nel gabinetto)  (enters the toilet)

SCENA VIII  (SCENE VIII)
Susanna, la Contessa e poi il Conte  (Susanna, the Countess and then the Count)

LA CONTESSA
Susanna, son morta,  (Susanna, I'm,)
il fiato mi manca.  (I can not breathe.)

SUSANNA
(addita alla Contessa la finestra onde è saltato Cherubino)  (points to the Countess at the window where Cherubino jumped)
Più lieta, più franca,  (More happy, more frank, she)
in salvo è di già.  (is already safe.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(esce dal gabinetto)  (out from the toilet)
Che sbaglio mai presi!  (What a mistake I made!)
Appena lo credo;  (I just believe it;)
se a torto v'offesi  (if I wrongly offended)
perdono vi chiedo;  (you, I ask you for forgiveness;)
ma far burla simile  (but making such a joke)
è poi crudeltà.  (is also cruelty.)

LA CONTESSA e SUSANNA  (L A C ONTESSA and SUSANNA)
Le vostre follie  (Your foolish)
non mertan pietà.  (acts deserve no mercy.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Io v'amo.  (I love you.)

LA CONTESSA
Nol dite!  (Do not say that!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Vel giuro.  (Vel swear.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Mentite.  (You lie.)
Son l'empia, l'infida  (I am the wicked, the treacherous)
che ognora v'inganna.  (who deceives you every time.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Quell'ira, Susanna,  (me, Susanna,)
m'aita a calmar.  (aid me to calm her.)

SUSANNA
Così si condanna  (So)
chi può sospettar.  (those who can suspectare condemned.)

LA CONTESSA
Adunque la fede  (then a faithful)
d'un'anima amante  (of a loving soul)
sì fiera mercede  (so fair reward)
doveva sperar?  (expect in return?)

SUSANNA
Signora!  (Madam!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Rosina!  (Rosina!)

LA CONTESSA
(al Conte)  (the Count)
Crudele!  (Cruel!)
Più quella non sono;  (More that I am not;)
ma il misero oggetto  (but the miserable object)
del vostro abbandono  (of your abandonment)
che avete diletto  (which you have delighted)
di far disperar.  (in causing despair.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Confuso, pentito,  (Confused, repentant,)
son troppo punito,  (I've been punished,)
abbiate pietà.  (have mercy.)

SUSANNA
Confuso, pentito,  (Confused, repentant, he)
è troppo punito,  (is too punished,)
abbiate pietà.  (have mercy.)

LA CONTESSA  (T HE C ONTESS To suffer)
Soffrir sì gran torto  (such a great wrong)
quest'alma non sa.  (thissouldoes not know.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ma il paggio rinchiuso?  (But the page locked?)

LA CONTESSA
Fu sol per provarvi.  (was only to test you.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ma i tremiti, i palpiti?  (But tremors, palpitations?)

LA CONTESSA
Fu sol per burlarvi.  (Was only to ridicule.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ma un foglio sì barbaro?  (But a barbarian letter?)

LA CONTESSA e SUSANNA  (L A C ONTESSA and SUSANNA)
Di Figaro è il foglio,  (Di Figaro is the paper,)
e a voi per Basilio.  (and to you for Basilio.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ah perfidi! Io voglio...  (Ah wicked! I want...)

LA CONTESSA e SUSANNA  (L A C ONTESSA and SUSANNA)
Perdono non merta  (Forgiveness does not Merta)
chi agli altri nol da.  (those from other nol.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ebben, se vi piace  (Ebben, if you like)
comune è la pace;  (the town is peace;)
Rosina inflessibile  (Rosina)
con me non sarà.  (will not beinflexiblewith me.)

LA CONTESSA
Ah quanto, Susanna,  (Oh, Susanna,)
son dolce di core!  (what a soft heart! Who will believe more)
Di donne al furore  (of women in fury)
chi più crederà?  (?)

SUSANNA
Cogl'uomin, signora,  (Cogl'uomin, lady,)
girate, volgete,  (turn, turn,)
vedrete che ognora  (you will see that each time)
si cade poi là.  (you fall there.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Guardatemi...  (Look ...)

LA CONTESSA
Ingrato!  (Ungrateful!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ho torto, e mi pento.  (I am wrong, and I repent.)

LA CONTESSA, SUSANNA ed IL CONTE  (L A C ONTESSA , SUSANNA and The Count)
Da questo momento  (From this moment)
quest'alma a conoscermi/conoscerla/conoscervi  (quest'alma to know / know / know you)
apprender potrà.  (apprender can.)

SCENA IX  (SCENE IX)
I suddetti e Figaro  (The above and Figaro)

FIGARO
Signori, di fuori  (Gentlemen,)
son già i suonatori.  (the players are alreadyoutside.)
Le trombe sentite,  (Heard the trumpets,)
i pifferi udite, tra canti, tra balli  (the fifes heard, among songs, among dances)
de' nostri vassalli  (of our vassals)
corriamo, voliamo  (we run, we fly)
le nozze a compir.  (the wedding to accomplish.)
(prendendo Susanna sotto il braccio)  (taking Susanna under the arm)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Pian piano, men fretta;  (Calm down, less haste;)

FIGARO
La turba m'aspetta.  (The crowd awaits me.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Un dubbio toglietemi  (A doubt deprive me)
in pria di partir.  (in before you go.)

LA CONTESSA, SUSANNA e FIGARO  (L A C ONTESSA , SUSANNA and F IGARO)
La cosa è scabrosa;  (The thing is rough;)
com'ha da finir!  (how it has to end!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(Con arte le carte  (With art cards)
convien qui scoprir.)  (behooves scoprir here.)
(a Figaro)  (Figaro)
Conoscete, signor Figaro,  (You know, Mr. Figaro,)
(mostrandogli il foglio)  (showing the sheet)
questo foglio chi vergò?  (this leaflet who Vergo?)

FIGARO
Nol conosco...  (Nol I know ...)

SUSANNA, LA CONTESSA ed IL CONTE  (SUSANNA , L A C ONTESSA and The Count)
Nol conosci?  (do not know?)

FIGARO
No, no, no!  (No, no, no!)

SUSANNA
E nol desti a Don Basilio...  (And you did not wake up to Don Basilio ...)

LA CONTESSA
Per recarlo...  (To take it ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Tu c'intendi...  (You c'intendi ...)

FIGARO
Oibò, oibò.  (Oibò, oibò.)

SUSANNA
E non sai del damerino...  (And you don't know about the fop ...)

LA CONTESSA
Che stasera nel giardino...  (That evening in the garden ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Già capisci...  (already know ...)

FIGARO
Io non lo so.  (I don't know.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Cerchi invan difesa e scusa  (In vain you look for defenses, excuses)
il tuo ceffo già t'accusa,  (your face accuses you,)
vedo ben che vuoi mentir.  (I see well that lie to you.)

FIGARO
Mente il ceffo, io già non mento.  (Mind the thug , I don't lie already.)

LA CONTESSA e SUSANNA  (L A C ONTESSA and SUSANNA)
Il talento aguzzi invano  (The sharp talent vain)
palesato abbiam l'arcano,  (revealed the secret we have,)
non v'è nulla da ridir.  (there is nothing to say in answer.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Che rispondi?  (What answer?)

FIGARO
Niente, niente.  (Nothing, nothing.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Dunque accordi?  (So agreements?)

FIGARO
Non accordo.  (I do n't agree.)

SUSANNA e LA CONTESSA  (SUSANNA and L A C ONTESSA)
Eh via, chetati, balordo,  (Come on, be quiet, you fool,)
la burletta ha da finir.  (the joke has come to an end.)

FIGARO
Per finirla lietamente  (To end it happily)
e all'usanza teatrale  (and to theatrical custom , we will now have)
un'azion matrimoniale  (a marriage action)
le faremo ora seguir.  (.)

LA CONTESSA, SUSANNA e FIGARO  (L A C ONTESSA , SUSANNA and F IGARO)
(al Conte)  (the Count)
Deh signor, nol contrastate,  (Ah, sir, do not contrast,)
consolate i lor/miei desir.  (consoled the their / my wishes.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(Marcellina, Marcellina!  (Marcellina, Marcellina!)
Quanto tardi a comparir!)  (How late in coming!)

SCENA X  (SCENE X)
I suddetti ed Antonio giardiniere  (The aforementioned and Antonio a gardener)
con un vaso di garofani schiacciato  (with a crushed vase of carnations)

ANTONIO
Ah, signor...signor...  (Ah, mister ... mister ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Cosa è stato?...  (What was it? ...)

ANTONIO
Che insolenza! Chi'l fece! Chi fu!  (What insolence! Who did it! Who was!)

LA CONTESSA, SUSANNA, IL CONTE e FIGARO  (L A C ONTESSA , SUSANNA , The L C ONTE and F IGARO)
Cosa dici, cos'hai, cosa è nato?  (What are you saying, what, what were you born?)

ANTONIO
Ascoltate...  (Listen ...)

LA CONTESSA, SUSANNA, IL CONTE e FIGARO  (L A C ONTESSA , SUSANNA , The L C ONTE and F IGARO)
Via, parla, di', su.  (Street, speaks of 'on.)

ANTONIO
Dal balcone che guarda in giardino  (From the balcony overlooking the garden a)
mille cose ogni dì gittar veggio,  (thousand things every day gittar I see,)
e poc'anzi, può darsi di peggio,  (and just now, it could be worse,)
vidi un uom, signor mio, gittar giù.  (I saw a man, my lord, throwing down.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Dal balcone?  (From the balcony?)

ANTONIO
(mostrandogli il vaso)  (showing him the vase)
Vedete i garofani?  (Do you see the carnations?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
In giardino?  (In the garden?)

ANTONIO
Sì!  (Yes!)

SUSANNA e LA CONTESSA  (SUSANNA and L A C ONTESSA)
(piano a Figaro)  (softly to Figaro)
Figaro, all'erta.  (Figaro, alert.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Cosa sento!  (What do I hear!)

SUSANNA, LA CONTESSA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA , L A C ONTESSA and F IGARO)
Costui ci sconcerta,  (fellow has upset)
quel briaco che viene far qui?  (What is that drunkard doing here?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(ad Antonio)  (Antonio)
Dunque un uom... ma dov'è, dov'è gito?  (That man ... but where, where is gito?)

ANTONIO
Ratto, ratto, il birbone è fuggito  (Rat, rat, the rascal has fled)
e ad un tratto di vista m'uscì.  (and suddenly he saw me.)

SUSANNA
(piano a Figaro)
Sai che il paggio...  (softly to Figaro) You know that the page ...)

FIGARO
(piano a Susanna)
So tutto, lo vidi.  (softly to Susanna) I know everything, I saw it.)
Ah, ah, ah!  (Ah, ah, ah!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Taci là.  (quiet over there.)

ANTONIO
(a Figaro)  (to Figaro)
Cosa ridi?  (What are you laughing at?)

FIGARO
(ad Antonio)  (to Antonio)
Tu sei cotto dal sorger del dì.  (You are cooked from the dawn of the day.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(ad Antonio)  (Antonio)
Or ripetimi: un uom dal balcone...  (Or me again: a man from the balcony ...)

ANTONIO
Dal balcone...  (From the balcony ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
In giardino...  (In the garden ...)

ANTONIO
In giardino...  (In the garden ...)

SUSANNA, LA CONTESSA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA , L A C ONTESSA and F IGARO)
Ma, signore, se in lui parla il vino!  (But, sir, if he talks about wine!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(ad Antonio)  (Antonio)
Segui pure, né in volto il vedesti?  (Follow as well, nor see his face?)

ANTONIO
No, nol vidi.  (No, I didn't see him.)

SUSANNA e LA CONTESSA  (SUSANNA and L A C ONTESSA)
(piano a Figaro)  (softly to Figaro)
Olá, Figaro, ascolta!  (Olá, Figaro, listen!)

FIGARO
(ad Antonio)  (to Antonio)
Via, piangione, sta zitto una volta,  (Come on, cry, shut up once,)
per tre soldi far tanto tumulto!  (for threesousso much uproar!)
Giacché il fatto non può star occulto,  (Since the fact cannot be hidden,)
sono io stesso saltato di lì.  (I myself have jumped from there.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Chi? Voi stesso?  (Who? You yourself?)

SUSANNA e LA CONTESSA  (SUSANNA and L A C ONTESS)
Che testa! Che ingegno!  (What a head! What ingenuity!)

FIGARO
(al Conte)  (to the Count)
Che stupor!  (What a stupor!)

ANTONIO  (A NTONIO)
(a Figaro)  (to Figaro)
Chi? Voi stesso?  (Who? You yourself?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Già creder nol posso.  (Already can not believe it.)

ANTONIO
(a Figaro)  (to Figaro)
Come mai diventaste sì grosso?  (Why did you get so big?)
Dopo il salto non foste così.  (You weren't like that after the jump.)

FIGARO
A chi salta succede così.  (This is what happens to those who jump.)

ANTONIO
Chi'l direbbe.  (Who would say it.)

SUSANNA e LA CONTESSA  (SUSANNA and L A C ONTESSA)
(a Figaro)  (to Figaro)
Ed insiste quel pazzo!  (And the madman insists!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(ad Antonio)  (Antonio)
Tu che dici?  (What do you say?)

ANTONIO
A me parve il ragazzo.  (He seemed the boy to me.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Cherubin!  (Cherubin!)

SUSANNA e LA CONTESSA  (SUSANNA and L A C ONTESSA)
Maledetto!  (Damn!)

FIGARO
Esso appunto  (It is precisely)
da Siviglia a cavallo qui giunto,  (here on horseback)
da Siviglia ov'ei forse sarà.  (from Seville,from Seville where he may perhaps be.)

ANTONIO
Questo no, questo no, che il cavallo  (This no, this no, that)
io non vidi saltare di là.  (I did not seethe horsejump over there.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Che pazienza! Finiam questo ballo!  (What patience! Let's finish this dance!)

SUSANNA e LA CONTESSA  (SUSANNA and L A C ONTESSA)
Come mai, giusto ciel, finirà?  (How come, right heaven, will it end?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(a Figaro)  (Figaro)
Dunque tu..  (So you ..)

FIGARO
Saltai giù.  (I jumped down.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ma perché?  (But why?)

FIGARO  (F IGARO Fear)
Il timor...  (...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Che timor?  (What fear?)

FIGARO
(additando la camera delle serve)  (pointing to the servants' room)
Là rinchiuso  (Lockedup there)
aspettando quel caro visetto...  (waiting for that dear little face ...)
Tippe tappe, un sussurro fuor d'uso...  (Tippe stages, an out-of-use whisper ...)
voi gridaste...lo scritto biglietto...  (you shouted ... the written note ...)
saltai giù dal terrore confuso...  (I jumped out of confused terror ...)
(fingendo d'aversi stroppiato il piede)  ( pretending to have choked his foot)
e stravolto m'ho un nervo del pie'!  (and upset I have a nerve of the pie '!)

ANTONIO
(porgendo a Figaro alcune carte chiuse)  (handing Figaro some closed papers)
Vostre dunque saran queste carte  (So yours will be these papers)
che perdeste...  (you have lost ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(togliendogliele)  (togliendogliele)
Olà, porgile a me.  (Here, give them to me.)

FIGARO
(piano alla Contessa e Susanna)
Sono in trappola.  (softly to the Countess and Susanna) I'm trapped.)

SUSANNA e LA CONTESSA  (SUSANNA and L A C ONTESSA)
(piano a Figaro)  (softly to Figaro)
Figaro, all'erta.  (Figaro, alert.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(apre il foglio e lo chiude tosto)  (opens the paper and soon closes)
Dite un po', questo foglio cos'è?  (Tell me ', this leaflet is it?)

FIGARO
(cavando di tasca alcune carte per guardare)
Tosto, tosto ... ne ho tanti - aspettate.  (pulling some papers out of his pocket to look at) Quickly, quickly ... I have many - wait.)

ANTONIO
Sarà forse il sommario de' debiti.  (Perhaps it will be the summary of the debts.)

FIGARO
No, la lista degl'osti.  (No, the list of hosts.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(a Figaro)  (Figaro)
Parlate.  (Talk.)
(ad Antonio)  (to Antonio)
E tu lascialo; e parti.  (And you leave him; and leave.)

SUSANNA, LA CONTESSA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA , L A C ONTESSA and F IGARO)
(ad Antonio)  (to Antonio)
Lascialo/Lasciami, e parti.  (Leave him / Leave me, and go.)

ANTONIO
Parto, sì, ma se torno a trovarti...  (I'm leaving , yes, but if I come back to see you ...)

FIGARO
Vanne, vanne, non temo di te.  (Vanne, vanne, I'm not afraid of you.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(riapre la carta e poi tosto la chiude; a Figaro)  (reopens the card and then soon closes it; to Figaro)
Dunque...  (So ...)

LA CONTESSA
(piano a Susanna)  (softly to Susanna)
O ciel! La patente del paggio!  (Heavens! The page's license!)

SUSANNA
(piano a Figaro)
Giusti Dei, la patente!  (softly to Figaro) Giusti Dei, the driver's license!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(a Figaro)  (Figaro)
Coraggio!  (Courage!)

FIGARO
Uh, che testa! Questa è la patente  (Uh, what a head! This is the license)
che poc'anzi il fanciullo mi die'.  (that the child gave me just now.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Per che fare?  (What for?)

FIGARO
Vi manca...  (You miss ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Vi manca?  (you missing?)

LA CONTESSA
(piano a Susanna)  (softly to Susanna)
Il suggello.  (The seal.)

SUSANNA
(piano a Figaro)
Il suggello.  (softly to Figaro) The seal.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Rispondi.  (Reply.)

FIGARO
È l'usanza...  (It is the custom ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Su via, ti confondi?  (Su, are you confused?)

FIGARO
È l'usanza di porvi il suggello.  (It is the custom of placing the seal on it.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(guarda e vede che manca il sigillo; guasta il foglio e con somma collera lo getta)  (looks and sees that the seal is missing; spoils the sheet and throws it with great anger)
(Questo birbo mi toglie il cervello,  (This rascal takes my brain off,)
tutto, tutto è un mistero per me.)  (everything, everything is a mystery to me.)

SUSANNA e LA CONTESSA  (SUSANNA and L A C ONTESSA)
(Se mi salvo da questa tempesta  (If I save myself from this storm you will)
più non avvi naufragio per me.)  (no longer be shipwrecked for me.)

FIGARO
(Sbuffa invano e la terra calpesta;  (He snorts in vain and the earth tramples;)
poverino ne sa men di me.)  (poor thing knows less than me.)

SCENA XI ED ULTIMA  (SCENE XI AND LAST)
I suddetti , Marcellina, Bartolo e Basilio  (The above, Marcellina, Bartolo and Basilio)

MARCELLINA, BASILIO e BARTOLO  (MARCELLINA , BASILIO and B ARTOLO)
(al Conte)  (to the Count)
Voi signor, che giusto siete  (You, sir, you are right, you)
ci dovete ascoltar.  (must listen to us.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(Son venuti a vendicarmi  (Son come to avenge)
io mi sento a consolar.)  (I feel to console.)

SUSANNA, LA CONTESSA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA , L A C ONTESSA and F IGARO)
(Son venuti a sconcertarmi  (They have come to bewilder me)
qual rimedio ritrovar?)  (what remedy can I find?)

FIGARO
(al Conte)  (to the Count) They are)
Son tre stolidi, tre pazzi,  (three foolish, three mad,)
cosa mai vengono a far?  (what on earth do they come to do?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Pian pianin, senza schiamazzi  (Softly no rowdiness)
dica ognun quel che gli par.  (tell every one what he seems.)

MARCELLINA
Un impegno nuziale  (A nuptial commitment)
ha costui con me contratto.  (has contracted with me.)
E pretendo che il contratto  (And I demand that the contract)
deva meco effettuar.  (must be carried out with me.)

SUSANNA, LA CONTESSA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA , L A C ONTESSA and F IGARO)
Come! Come!  (How! As!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Olà, silenzio!  (Hola, silence!)
Io son qui per giudicar.  (I am here to judge.)

BARTOLO  (B ARTICLE)
Io da lei scelto avvocato  (I, chosen by you as a lawyer,)
vengo a far le sue difese,  (come to make your defense,)
le legittime pretese,  (the legitimate claims,)
io qui vengo a palesar.  (here I come to reveal.)

SUSANNA, LA CONTESSA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA , L A C ONTESSA and F IGARO)
È un birbante!  (is a rascal!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Olà, silenzio!  (Hola, silence!)
Io son qui per giudicar.  (I am here to judge.)

BASILIO
Io, com'uom al mondo cognito  (I, like a man in the known world,)
vengo qui per testimonio  (come here to witness)
del promesso matrimonio  (the promised marriage)
con prestanza di danar.  (with the prestige of danar.)

SUSANNA, LA CONTESSA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA , L A C ONTESSA and F IGARO)
Son tre matti.  (They are all mad.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Olà, silenzio! Lo vedremo,  (Hola, silence! We will see, we will)
il contratto leggeremo,  (read the contract,)
tutto in ordin deve andar.  (everything must go in order.)

SUSANNA, LA CONTESSA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA , L A C ONTESSA and F IGARO I)
Son confusa/o, son stordita/o,  (am confused, I am stunned,)
disperata/o, sbalordita/o.  (desperate, amazed.)
Certo un diavol dell'inferno  (Certainly a devil from hell)
qui li ha fatti capitar.  (made them happen here.)

MARCELLINA, BASILIO, BARTOLO ed IL CONTE  (MARCELLINA , BASILIO , B ARTOLO and The Count)
Che bel colpo, che bel caso!  (telling blow, what a chance!)
È cresciuto a tutti il naso,  (Everyone's nose has grown,)
qualche nume a noi propizio  (some gods propitious to us)
qui ci/li ha fatti capitar.  (here / made them happen.)

Atto primo  (Act one)
Atto secondo  (Act two)
Atto terzo  (Act three)
Atto quarto  (Act four)

ATTO TERZO  (ACT THREE)
Sala ricca con due troni e preparata a festa nuziale  (Rich room with two thrones and prepared for a wedding party)

SCENA I  (SCENE I)
Il Conte solo  (The Count alone)

Recitativo

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Che imbarazzo è mai questo!  (How embarrassing is this!)
Un foglio anonimo...  (An anonymous sheet ...)
La cameriera in gabinetto chiusa...  (The maid in the closed toilet ...)
La padrona confusa... un uom che salta  (The confused mistress ... a man who jumps)
dal balcone in giardino...un altro appresso  (from the balcony into the garden ... another one)
che dice esser quel desso...  (that he says is that man ...)
non so cosa pensar. Potrebbe forse  (I don't know what to think. Could perhaps)
qualcun de' miei vassalli...a simil razza  (some of my vassals ... daring)
è comune l'ardir, ma la Contessa...  (is commonto a similar race, but the Countess ...)
Ah, che un dubbio l'offende.  (Ah, that a doubt offends her.)
Ella rispetta troppo sé stessa:  (She respects herself too much:)
e l'onor mio... l'onore...  (and my honor ... honor ...)
dove diamin l'ha posto umano errore!  (where on earth has human error placed it!)

SCENA II  (SCENE II)
Il suddetto, la Contessa e Susanna;  (The above, the Countess and Susanna;)
s'arrestano in fondo alla scena, non vedute dal Conte  (they stop at the end of the scene, not seen by the Count)

LA CONTESSA
(a Susanna)  (Susanna)
Via, fatti core: digli  (Street, core facts: tell him)
che ti attenda in giardino.  (that I wait in the garden.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Saprò se Cherubino  (I'll know if Cherubino)
era giunto a Siviglia. A tale oggetto  (had come to Seville. To this object)
ho mandato Basilio...  (I sent Basilio ...)

SUSANNA
(alla Contessa)  (to the Countess)
Oh cielo! E Figaro?  (Oh dear ! And Figaro?)

LA CONTESSA
A lui non dei dir nulla: in vece tua  (He did not speak of anything in your place)
voglio andarci io medesma.  (I want to go there I selfsame.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Avanti sera  (Next evening)
dovrebbe ritornar...  (should be back ...)

SUSANNA
Oh Dio... non oso!  (Oh God ... I don't dare!)

LA CONTESSA
Pensa, ch'è in tua mano il mio riposo.  (Think, which is in your hand my rest.)
(si nasconde)  (hides)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
E Susanna? Chi sa ch'ella tradito  (And Susanna? Who knows that she)
abbia il segreto mio... oh, se ha parlato,  (has my secretbetrayed... oh, if he has spoken, I will let)
gli fo sposar la vecchia.  (him marry the old woman.)

SUSANNA
(Marcellina!) Signor...  (Marcellina!) Mr ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Cosa bramate?  (What do you want?)

SUSANNA
Mi par che siete in collera!  (It seems to me that you are angry!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Volete qualche cosa?  (Do you want anything?)

SUSANNA
Signor... la vostra sposa  (Sir ... your bride)
ha i soliti vapori,  (has the usual vapors,)
e vi chiede il fiaschetto degli odori.  (and she asks you for the flask of smells.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Prendete.  (Take.)

SUSANNA
Or vel riporto.  (Now vel carry.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ah no, potete  (Ah no, you can)
Ritenerlo per voi.  (feel it for you.)

SUSANNA
Per me?  (For me?)
Questi non son mali  (These are not the evils)
da donne triviali.  (of trivial women.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Un'amante, che perde il caro sposo  (A lover who loses her dear husband)
sul punto d'ottenerlo.  (on the verge of getting it.)

SUSANNA
Pagando Marcellina  (Paying Marcellina)
colla dote che voi mi prometteste...  (with the dowry you promised me ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ch'io vi promisi, quando?  (That I promised, when?)

SUSANNA  (SUSANNA I)
Credea d'averlo inteso.  (thought I understood it.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Sì, se voluto aveste  (Yes, if you had wanted to)
intendermi voi stessa.  (understand me yourself.)

SUSANNA
È mio dovere,  (It is my duty,)
e quel di Sua Eccellenza il mio volere.  (and that of His Excellency my will.)

N. 17. Duettino  (N. 17. Duettino)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Crudel! Perché finora  (Heartless! Why so far)
farmi languir così?  (make me languish like this?)

SUSANNA
Signor, la donna ognora  (Mr., the woman every)
tempo ha dir di sì.  (time has said yes.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Dunque, in giardin verrai?  (So, in giardin will you come?)

SUSANNA
Se piace a voi, verrò.  (If you like it, I'll come.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
E non mi mancherai?  (you will not fail me?)

SUSANNA
No, non vi mancherò.  (No, I won't miss you.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Mi sento dal contento  (My contented heart)
pieno di gioia il cor.  (filled with joy my heart.)

SUSANNA
Scusatemi se mento,  (Excuse me for lying ,)
voi che intendete amor.  (you who mean love.)

Recitativo

IL CONTE  (The Count)
E perché fosti meco  (And because you were with me)
stamattina sì austera?  (this morning so austere?)

SUSANNA
Col paggio ch'ivi c'era...  (With the page you were there ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ed a Basilio  (And to Basil)
che per me ti parlò?  (that you spoke to me?)

SUSANNA
Ma qual bisogno  (But what need)
abbiam noi, che un Basilio...  (do we have, that a Basilio ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
È vero, è vero,  (is true, it is true,)
e mi prometti poi...  (and then I promise ...)
se tu manchi, oh cor mio... Ma la Contessa  (if you miss you, oh my heart ... But the Countess)
attenderà il fiaschetto.  (will wait for the smelling salts.)

SUSANNA
Eh, fu un pretesto.  (Eh, it was a pretext.)
Parlato io non avrei senza di questo.  (I would not have spoken without this.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(le prende la mano)  (takes her hand)
Carissima!  (Dearest!)

SUSANNA
(si ritira)  (withdraws)
Vien gente.  (Come people.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(È mia senz'altro.)  (It is my doubt.)

SUSANNA
(Forbitevi la bocca, oh signor scaltro.)  (Shear your mouth, oh shrewd mister.)

SCENA III  (SCENE III)
Figaro, Susanna ed il Conte  (Figaro, Susanna and the Count)

FIGARO
Ehi, Susanna, ove vai?  (Hey, Susanna, where are you going?)

SUSANNA
Taci, senza avvocato  (Shut up, without a lawyer)
hai già vinta la causa.  (you have already won the case.)
(parte)  (part)

FIGARO
Cos'è nato?  (What was born?)
(la segue)  (follows it)

SCENA IV  (SCENE IV)
Il Conte solo  (The Count alone)

N. 18. Recitativo ed Aria  (No. 18. Recitative and Aria)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Hai già vinta la causa! Cosa sento!  (You have already won your case! What I feel!)
In qual laccio io cadea? Perfidi! Io voglio...  (In what snare did I fall? Perfidious! I want ...)
Di tal modo punirvi... A piacer mio  (In this way to punish you ... At my pleasure)
la sentenza sarà... Ma s'ei pagasse  (the sentence will be ... But what if he pays)
la vecchia pretendente?  (the old suitor?)
Pagarla! In qual maniera! E poi v'è Antonio,  (Pay it! How! And then there is Antonio,)
che a un incognito Figaro ricusa  (who refuses)
di dare una nipote in matrimonio.  (to give a niece in marriageto an unknown figure.)
Coltivando l'orgoglio  (By cultivating the pride)
di questo mentecatto...  (of this fool ...)
Tutto giova a un raggiro... il colpo è fatto.  (Everything benefits a scam ... the blow is done.)

Vedrò mentre io sospiro,  (I will see while I sigh,)
felice un servo mio!  (happy a servant of mine!)
E un ben ch'invan desio,  (And a ben that desio invaders,)
ei posseder dovrà?  (will he have to possess?)
Vedrò per man d'amore  (Will I see by the hand of love)
unita a un vile oggetto  (united with a vile object)
chi in me destò un affetto  (who aroused in me an affection)
che per me poi non ha?  (that does not have for me then?)
Ah no, lasciarti in pace,  (Ah no, leave you in peace,)
non vo' questo contento,  (I do not want this contentment,)
tu non nascesti, audace,  (you were not born, daring,)
per dare a me tormento,  (to give me torment,)
e forse ancor per ridere  (and perhaps even to laugh)
di mia infelicità.  (at my unhappiness.)
Già la speranza sola  (Already the only hope)
delle vendette mie  (of my revenge)
quest'anima consola,  (this soul consoles,)
e giubilar mi fa.  (and makes me jubilant.)

SCENA V  (SCENE V)
Il Conte, Marcellina, Don Curzio, Figaro e Bartolo; poi Susanna  (The Count, Marcellina, Don Curzio, Figaro and Bartolo; then Susanna)

Recitativo

DON CURZIO  (D ON CURZIO)
È decisa la lite.  (The dispute has been decided.)
O pagarla, o sposarla, ora ammutite.  (Either pay her, or marry her, now fall silent.)

MARCELLINA
Io respiro.  (I breathe.)

FIGARO
Ed io moro.  (And I die .)

MARCELLINA
(Alfin sposa io sarò d'un uom ch'adoro.)  (At last I will marry a man I adore.)

FIGARO  (F IGARO Your)
Eccellenza m'appello...  (Excellency I appeal ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
È giusta la sentenza.  (is the right decision.)
O pagar, o sposar, bravo Don Curzio.  (Or pay, or marry, good Don Curzio.)

DON CURZIO  (D ON CURZIO)
Bontà di sua Eccellenza.  (Kindness of his Excellency.)

BARTOLO  (B ARTICLE)
Che superba sentenza!  (What a superb sentence!)

FIGARO  (F IGARO How)
In che superba?  (superb?)

BARTOLO  (B ARTICLE We are)
Siam tutti vendicati...  (all avenged ...)

FIGARO
Io non la sposerò.  (I will not marry her.)

BARTOLO  (B ARTOLO)
La sposerai.  (You will marry her.)

DON CURZIO  (D ON CURZIO)
O pagarla, o sposarla. Lei t'ha prestati  (Either pay her, or marry her. She lent you)
due mille pezzi duri.  (two thousand hard pieces.)

FIGARO  (F IGARO I)
Son gentiluomo, e senza  (am a gentleman, and without)
l'assenso de' miei nobili parenti...  (the consent of my noble relatives ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Dove sono? Chi sono?  (Where am I? Who I am?)

FIGARO
Lasciate ancor cercarli!  (Let us look for them again!)
Dopo dieci anni io spero di trovarli.  (After ten years I hope to find them.)

BARTOLO  (B ARTICLE)
Qualche bambin trovato?  (Any children found?)

FIGARO
No, perduto, dottor, anzi rubato.  (No, lost, doctor, indeed stolen.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Come?  (How?)

MARCELLINA
Cosa?  (What?)

BARTOLO  (B ARTICLE)
La prova?  (The proof?)

DON CURZIO  (D ON CURZIO)
Il testimonio?  (The witness?)

FIGARO
L'oro, le gemme, e i ricamati panni,  (The gold, the gems, and the embroidered cloths,)
che ne' più teneri anni  (which in the tenderest years)
mi ritrovaro addosso i masnadieri,  (I find the robbers on me,)
sono gl'indizi veri  (are the true indications)
di mia nascita illustre, e sopra tutto  (of my illustrious birth, and above all)
questo al mio braccio impresso geroglifico...  (this on my arm imprinted hieroglyph ...)

MARCELLINA
Una spatola impressa al braccio destro...  (A spatula impressed on the right arm ...)

FIGARO
E a voi chi'l disse?  (Who said it to you?)

MARCELLINA
Oh Dio, è egli...  (Oh God, is he ...)

FIGARO
È ver son io.  (It is true that I am.)

DON CURZIO, IL CONTE e BARTOLO  (D ON CURZIO , The L C ONTE and B ARTOLO)
Chi?  (Who?)

MARCELLINA
Raffaello.  (Raphael.)

BARTOLO  (B ARTOLO)
E i ladri ti rapir...  (And the thieves will kidnap you ...)

FIGARO
Presso un castello.  (At a castle.)

BARTOLO  (B ARTOLO)
Ecco tua madre.  (Here is your mother.)

FIGARO  (F IGARO Nurse)
Balia...  (...)

BARTOLO  (B ARTICLE)
No, tua madre.  (No, your mother.)

IL CONTE e DON CURZIO  (The L C ONTE and D ON CURZIO)
Sua madre!  (His mother!)

FIGARO
Cosa sento!  (What do I hear!)

MARCELLINA
Ecco tuo padre.  (Here is your father.)

N. 19. Sestetto  (No. 19. Sextet)

MARCELLINA
(abbracciando Figaro)  (embracing Figaro)
Riconosci in questo amplesso  (Recognize)
una madre, amato figlio!  (a motherin this embrace, beloved son!)

FIGARO
(a Bartolo)  (to Bartolo)
Padre mio, fate lo stesso,  (My Father, do the same,)
non mi fate più arrossir.  (don't make me blush any more.)

BARTOLO  (B ARTOLO)
(abbracciando Figaro)  (embracing Figaro)
Resistenza la coscienza  (Resistance the conscience)
far non lascia al tuo desir.  (does not leave to your desire.)

DON CURZIO  (D ON CURZIO)
Ei suo padre, ella sua madre,  (And his father, she his mother,)
l'imeneo non può seguir.  (the hymen cannot follow.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Son smarrito, son stordito,  (Son lost, are stunned,)
meglio è assai di qua partir.  (the better it is very out of here.)

MARCELLINA e BARTOLO  (MARCELLINA and B ARTOLO)
Figlio amato!  (Beloved son!)

FIGARO
Parenti amati!  (Beloved relatives!)
(Il Conte vuol partire. Susanna entra con una borsa in mano.)  (The Count wants to leave. Susanna enters with a bag in her hand.)

SUSANNA
Alto,alto, signor Conte,  (Alto, alto, Signor Conte, a)
mille doppie son qui pronte,  (thousand doubles are here ready,)
a pagar vengo per Figaro,  (I come to pay for Figaro,)
ed a porlo in libertà.  (and to set him free.)

IL CONTE e DON CURZIO  (The L C ONTE and D ON CURZIO)
Non sappiam com'è la cosa,  (We're not sure what it's like,)
osservate un poco là!  (you look a little there!)

SUSANNA
(si volge vedendo Figaro che abbraccia Marcellina)  (turns to see Figaro embracing Marcellina)
Già d'accordo ei colla sposa;  (Already in agreement with his wife;)
giusti Dei, che infedeltà!  (righteous Gods, what infidelity!)
(vuol partire)  (wants to leave)
Lascia iniquo!  (Leave unfair!)

FIGARO
(trattenendo Susanna)  (holding back Susanna)
No, t'arresta!  (No, stop you!)
Senti, oh cara!  (Look, oh dear!)

SUSANNA
(dà uno schiaffo a Figaro)  (slaps Figaro)
Senti questa!  (Listen to this!)

MARCELLINA, BARTOLO e FIGARO  (MARCELLINA , B ARTOLO and F IGARO)
È un effetto di buon core,  (It's a good heart effect,)
tutto amore è quel che fa.  (all love is what it does.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Fremo, smanio dal furore,  (shivering, raging with fury,)
il destino a me la fa.  (the fate of me does it.)

DON CURZIO  (D ON CURZIO He)
Freme e smania dal furore,  (trembles and frenzies with fury,)
il destino gliela fa.  (destiny makes it to him.)

SUSANNA
Fremo, smanio dal furore,  (Fremo, frenzied with fury,)
una vecchia a me la fa.  (an old woman does it for me.)

MARCELLINA
(corre ad abbracciar Susanna)  (runs to embrace Susanna)
Lo sdegno calmate,  (Calm your indignation,)
mia cara figliuola,  (my dear daughter,)
sua madre abbracciate  (embrace her mother)
che or vostra sarà.  (who will now be yours.)

SUSANNA
Sua madre?  (Your mother?)

BARTOLO, IL CONTE, DON CURZIO e MARCELLINA  (B ARTOLO , The L C ONTE , D ON CURZIO and MARCELLINA)
Sua madre!  (His mother!)

SUSANNA
(a Figaro)  (to Figaro)
Tua madre?  (Your mother?)

FIGARO
(a Susanna)  (to Susanna)
E quello è mio padre  (And that's my father)
che a te lo dirà.  (who will tell you.)

SUSANNA
Suo padre?  (Your father?)

BARTOLO, IL CONTE, DON CURZIO e MARCELLINA  (B ARTOLO , The L C ONTE , D ON CURZIO and MARCELLINA)
Suo padre!  (Her father!)

SUSANNA
(a Figaro)  (to Figaro)
Tuo padre?  (Your father?)

FIGARO
(a Susanna)  (to Susanna)
E quella è mia madre  (And that's my mother)
che a te lo dirà.  (who will tell you.)
(Corrono tutti quattro ad abbracciarsi)  (All four run to hug each other)

SUSANNA, MARCELLINA, BARTOLO e FIGARO  (SUSANNA , MARCELLINA , B ARTOLO and F IGARO)
Al dolce contento  (To the sweet contentment)
di questo momento,  (of this moment,)
quest'anima appena  (this soul just)
resister or sa.  (resists now.)

DON CURZIO ed IL CONTE  (D ON CURZIO and The Count)
Al fiero tormento  (the fierce torture)
di questo momento,  (of this moment,)
quell'/quest'anima appena  (that '/ soul can barely)
resister or sa.  (resist any longer.)
(Il Conte e Don Curzio partono.)  (The Count and Don Curzio leave.)

SCENA VI  (SCENE VI)
Susanna, Marcellina, Figaro e Bartolo  (Susanna, Marcellina, Figaro and Bartolo)

Recitativo

MARCELLINA
(a Bartolo)  (to Bartolo)
Eccovi, oh caro amico, il dolce frutto  (Here you are, oh dear friend, the sweet fruit)
dell'antico amor nostro...  (of our ancient love ...)

BARTOLO  (B ARTICLE)
Or non parliamo  (Now let)
di fatti sì rimoti, egli è mio figlio,  ('snot talkabout such remote facts, he is my son,)
mia consorte voi siete;  (you are my consort;)
e le nozze farem quando volete.  (and we will do the wedding when you want.)

MARCELLINA
Oggi, e doppie saranno.  (Today, and they will be double.)
(dà il biglietto a Figaro)  (gives the note to Figaro)
Prendi, questo è il biglietto  (Take, this is the note)
del danar che a me devi, ed è tua dote.  (of the money you owe me, and it is your dowry.)

SUSANNA
(getta per terra una borsa di danari)  (throws a bag of money on the floor)
Prendi ancor questa borsa.  (Take this bag again.)

BARTOLO  (B ARTOLO)
(fa lo stesso)  (does the same)
E questa ancora.  (And this one again.)

FIGARO  (F IGARO Well done)
Bravi, gittate pur ch'io piglio ognora.  (, throw away as long as I always look.)

SUSANNA
Voliamo ad informar d'ogni avventura  (We want to inform)
madama e nostro zio.  (our uncle and madameof every adventure.)
Chi al par di me contenta!  (Who like me is happy!)

FIGARO, BARTOLO e MARCELLINA  (F IGARO , B ARTOLO and MARCELLINA)
Io!  (Me!)

SUSANNA, MARCELLINA, BARTOLO e FIGARO  (SUSANNA , MARCELLINA , B ARTOLO and F IGARO)
E schiatti il signor Conte al gusto mio.  (And schiatti Signor Conte to my taste.)
(partendo abbracciati)  (starting hugging each other)

SCENA VII  (SCENE VII)
Barbarina e Cherubino  (Barbarina and Cherubino)

Recitativo

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA)
Andiam, andiam, bel paggio, in casa mia  (Let's go, let's go, handsome page, in my house you)
tutte ritroverai  (will all find)
le più belle ragazze del castello,  (the most beautiful girls in the castle,)
di tutte sarai tu certo il più bello.  (you will certainly be the most beautiful of all.)

CHERUBINO
Ah, se il Conte mi trova,  (Ah, if the Count finds)
misero me, tu sai  (me, dear me, you know)
che partito ei mi crede per Siviglia.  (what a party and he believes me for Seville.)

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA)
Oh ve' che maraviglia, e se ti trova  (Oh, what a wonder, and if he finds you)
non sarà cosa nuova...  (it will not be new ...)
Odi... vogliamo vestirti come noi:  (Hate ... we want to dress you like us:)
tutte insiem andrem poi  (all together we will then go)
a presentar de' fiori a madamina;  (to present some flowers to Madamina;)
fidati, oh Cherubin, di Barbarina.  (trust, oh Cherubin, to Barbarina.)
(partono)  (they leave)

SCENA VIII  (SCENE VIII)
La Contessa sola  (The Countess alone)

N. 20. Recitativo ed Aria  (No. 20. Recitative and Aria)

LA CONTESSA
E Susanna non vien! Sono ansiosa  (Still Susanna does not come! I am anxious)
di saper come il Conte  (to know how the Count)
accolse la proposta. Alquanto ardito  (received the proposal. The)
il progetto mi par, e ad uno sposo  (project seems to merather daring, and to such a)
sì vivace, e geloso!  (lively and jealoushusband!)
Ma che mal c'è? Cangiando i miei vestiti  (What's wrong with that? Change my clothes)
con quelli di Susanna, e i suoi co' miei...  (for those of Susanna, and her co 'my ...)
al favor della notte... oh cielo, a quale  (the cover of darkness ... oh dear, what)
umil stato fatale io son ridotta  (humble and dangerous state I am reduced)
da un consorte crudel, che dopo avermi  (by a cruel husband, who after having)
con un misto inaudito  (a strange mixture)
d'infedeltà, di gelosia, di sdegni,  (of infidelity , of jealousy, of indignation,)
prima amata, indi offesa, e alfin tradita,  (first loved, then offended, and finally betrayed,)
fammi or cercar da una mia serva aita!  (let me look for one of my servants!)

Dove sono i bei momenti  (Where are the beautiful moments)
di dolcezza e di piacer,  (of sweetness and pleasure,)
dove andaro i giuramenti  (where will the oaths)
di quel labbro menzogner?  (of that lying lip go?)
Perché mai se in pianti e in pene  (Why on earth if in tears and pains)
per me tutto si cangiò,  (everything changed for me,)
la memoria di quel bene  (the memory of that good)
dal mio sen non trapassò?  (from my sen did not pass away?)
Ah! Se almen la mia costanza  (Ah! If at least my constancy)
nel languire amando ognor,  (in languishing loving each other,)
mi portasse una speranza  (would bring me a hope)
di cangiar l'ingrato cor.  (of changing the ungrateful heart.)
(parte)  (part)

SCENA IX  (SCENE IX)
Il Conte ed Antonio con cappello in mano  (The Count and Antonio with hat in hand)

Recitativo

ANTONIO
Io vi dico, signor, che Cherubino  (I tell you, sir, that Cherubino)
è ancora nel castello,  (is still in the castle,)
e vedete per prova il suo cappello.  (and you can see his hat for proof.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ma come, se a quest'ora  (But how, if at this time)
esser giunto a Siviglia egli dovria.  (he had reached Seville he dovria.)

ANTONIO
Scusate, oggi Siviglia è a casa mia,  (Excuse me, today Seville is at my house, I was)
là vestissi da donna, e là lasciati  (dressed as a woman there, and there)
ha gl'altri abiti suoi.  (she has her other clothesleft over there.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Perfidi!  (traitors!)

ANTONIO
Andiam, e li vedrete voi.  (Let's go, and you will see them.)
(Partono.)  (They leave.)

SCENA X  (SCENE X)
La Contessa e Susanna  (The Countess and Susanna)

Recitativo

LA CONTESSA
Cosa mi narri, e che ne disse il Conte?  (What I narrate, and that did the Count say?)

SUSANNA
Gli si leggeva in fronte  (He could read)
il dispetto e la rabbia.  (spite and angeron his forehead.)

LA CONTESSA
Piano, che meglio or lo porremo in gabbia.  (Plan that better or we will put you in a cage.)
Dov'è l'appuntamento  (Where is the appointment)
che tu gli proponesti?  (that you proposed to him?)

SUSANNA
In giardino.  (In the garden.)

LA CONTESSA
Fissiamgli un loco. Scrivi.  (Fissiamgli a site. You write.)

SUSANNA
Ch'io scriva... ma, signora...  (I write ... but, madam ...)

LA CONTESSA
Eh, scrivi dico; e tutto  (Eh, I say write; and everything)
(Susanna siede e scrive)  (Susanna sits and writes)
io prendo su me stessa.  (I take on myself.)
Canzonetta sull'aria...  (Little song about the air ...)

N.21. Duettino  (21. Duettino)

SUSANNA
(scrivendo)  (writing)
Sull'aria...  (On the air ...)

LA CONTESSA
Che soave zeffiretto...  (What a gentle zephyr ...)

SUSANNA
Zeffiretto...  (Zeffiretto ...)

LA CONTESSA
Questa sera spirerà...  (be this evening ...)

SUSANNA
Questa sera spirerà...  (This evening will expire ...)

LA CONTESSA
Sotto i pini del boschetto.  (Under the pine trees of the grove.)

SUSANNA
Sotto i pini...  (Under the pines ...)

LA CONTESSA
Sotto i pini del boschetto.  (Under the pine trees of the grove.)

SUSANNA
Sotto i pini...del boschetto...  (Under the pines ... of the grove ...)

LA CONTESSA
Ei già il resto capirà.  (Ei will understand the rest.)

SUSANNA
Certo, certo il capirà.  (Of course, he will certainly understand.)

Recitativo

SUSANNA
(piega la lettera)  (folds the letter)
Piegato è il foglio... or come si sigilla?  (Folded is the sheet ... or how is it sealed?)

LA CONTESSA
(si cava una spilla e gliela dà)  (cava is a pin and give it to him)
Ecco... prendi una spilla:  (Here ... take this pin:)
Servirà di sigillo. Attendi...scrivi  (Seal will serve. Wait ... write)
sul riverso del foglio,  (on the reverse of the paper,)
Rimandate il sigillo".  (Postpone the seal".)

SUSANNA
È più bizzarro  (It's more bizarre)
di quel della patente.  (than driving a driver's license.)

LA CONTESSA
Presto nascondi, io sento venir gente.  (Soon hide, I hear people coming.)
(Susanna si pone il biglietto nel seno.)  (Susanna places the note in her breast.)

SCENA XI  (SCENE XI)
Cherubino vestito da contadinella,  (Cherubino dressed as a peasant)
Barbarina e alcune altre contadinelle vestite nel medesimo modo  (girl , Barbarina and some other peasant girls dressed in the same way)
con mazzetti di fiori e i suddetti  (with bunches of flowers and the aforementioned)

N. 22. Coro  (No. 22. Chorus)

CONTADINELLE  (C ONTADINELLE)
Ricevete, oh padroncina,  (Receive, oh young lady ,)
queste rose e questi fior,  (these roses and these flowers,)
che abbiam colti stamattina  (which we picked this morning)
per mostrarvi il nostro amor.  (to show you our love.)
Siamo tante contadine,  (We are many peasant)
e siam tutte poverine,  (women,and we are all poor,)
ma quel poco che rechiamo  (but what littlewe bring)
ve lo diamo di buon cor.  (we give you with a good heart.)

Recitativo

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA)
Queste sono, madama,  (These are, madame,)
le ragazze del loco  (the local girls)
che il poco ch'han vi vengono ad offrire,  (who come to offer you the little they have,)
e vi chiedon perdon del loro ardire.  (and ask your pardon for their daring.)

LA CONTESSA
Oh brave, vi ringrazio.  (Oh good, thank you.)

SUSANNA
Come sono vezzose.  (How charming they are.)

LA CONTESSA
E chi è, narratemi,  (Who is he, narratemi,)
quell'amabil fanciulla  (quell'amabil maiden)
ch'ha l'aria sì modesta?  (man who has the modest air?)

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA She is)
Ell'è mia cugina, e per le nozze  (my cousin, and)
è venuta ier sera.  (she came last nightfor the wedding.)

LA CONTESSA
Onoriamo la bella forestiera,  (We honor the beautiful stranger,)
venite qui... datemi i vostri fiori.  (come here ... give me your flowers.)
(prende i fiori di Cherubino e lo bacia in fronte)  (takes Cherubino's flowers and kisses him on the forehead)
Come arrossì... Susanna, e non ti pare...  (How did she blush ... Susanna, and don't you think ...)
che somigli ad alcuno?  (that she looks like anyone?)

SUSANNA
Al naturale.  (Natural.)

SCENA XII  (SCENE XII)
I suddetti, il Conte ed Antonio  (The above, the Count and Antonio)

(Antonio ha il cappello di Cherubino:  (Antonio has Cherubino's hat: he)
entra in scena pian piano, gli cava la cuffia di donna  (enters the scene slowly, takes out the woman's cap)
e gli mette in testa il cappello stesso.)  (and puts the hat itself on his head.)

ANTONIO
Ehi! Cospettaccio! È questi l'uffiziale.  (Hey! I guess! This is the official.)

LA CONTESSA
Oh stelle!  (Oh stars!)

SUSANNA
(Malandrino!)  (Marauder!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ebben, madama!  (Ebben, madam!)

LA CONTESSA
Io sono, oh signor mio,  (I am, oh my lord,)
irritata e sorpresa al par di voi.  (irritated and surprised as you.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ma stamane...  (But this morning ...)

LA CONTESSA
Stamane...  (this morning ...)
Per l'odierna festa  (For today's feast)
volevam travestirlo al modo stesso,  (volevam disguise the same way,)
che l'han vestito adesso.  (that Han now dress.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(a Cherubino)  (to Cherubino)
E perché non partiste?  (And why do not you left?)

CHERUBINO
Signor!  (Mister!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Saprò punire  (I will know to punish)
la sua ubbidienza.  (his obedience.)

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA)
Eccellenza, Eccellenza,  (Excellency, Excellency,)
voi mi dite sì spesso  (you say so often to me)
qual volta m'abbracciate, e mi baciate:  (when you embrace me, and kiss me:)
Barbarina, se m'ami,  (Barbarina, if you love me,)
ti darò quel che brami...  (I will give you what you desire ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Io dissi questo?  (I said this?)

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA)
Voi.  (You.)
Or datemi , padrone,  (Now, master, give me)
in sposo Cherubino,  (Cherubino as my husband,)
e v'amerò, com'amo il mio gattino.  (and I will love you, as I love my kitten.)

LA CONTESSA
(al Conte)  (the Count)
Ebbene: or tocca a voi.  (Well; now it's your turn.)

ANTONIO  (TO NTONIO Good)
Brava figliuola,  (daughter,)
hai buon maestro, che ti fa scuola.  (you have a good teacher who teaches you.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(Non so qual uom, qual demone, qual Dio  (I don't know which man, which demon, which God)
rivolga tutto quanto a torto mio.)  (turns everything to my wrong.)

SCENA XIII  (SCENE XIII)
I suddetti e Figaro  (The above and Figaro)

FIGARO
Signor... se trattenete  (Mr. ... if you keep)
tutte queste ragazze,  (all these girls,)
addio feste... addio danza...  (goodbye parties ... goodbye dance ...)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
E che, vorresti  (And that, would you like)
ballar col pié stravolto?  (to dance with pié upset?)

FIGARO
(finge di drizzarsi la gamba e poi si prova a ballare)  (pretends to straighten his leg and then tries to dance)
Eh, non mi duol più molto.  (Eh, I don't feel much pain anymore.)
Andiam, belle fanciulle.  (Let's go, beautiful girls.)
(vuol partire, il Conte lo richiama)  (he wants to leave, the Count calls him back)

LA CONTESSA
(a Susanna)  (Susanna)
Come si caverà dall'imbarazzo?  (As you pull through embarrassment?)

SUSANNA
(alla Contessa)  (to the Countess)
Lasciate fare a lui.  (Leave it to him.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Per buona sorte  (Fortunately)
i vasi eran di creta.  (vessels were of clay.)

FIGARO
Senza fallo.  (Without fail .)
Andiamo dunque, andiamo.  (So let's go, let's go.)

ANTONIO
E intanto a cavallo  (And meanwhile)
di galoppo a Siviglia andava il paggio.  (the page went onhorsebackat a gallop to Seville.)

FIGARO
Di galoppo, o di passo... buon viaggio.  (At a gallop, or at a pace ... have a good trip.)
Venite, oh belle giovani.  (Come, oh beautiful young people.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
E a te la sua patente  (And his commission)
era in tasca rimasta...  (had remained in his pocket ...)

FIGARO
Certamente,  (Of course,)
che razza di domande!  (what kind of questions!)

ANTONIO
(a Susanna che fa de' motti a Figaro)  (to Susanna who makes mottos in Figaro)
Via, non gli far più motti, ei non t'intende.  (Come on , don't make mottos to him anymore, and he doesn't understand you.)
(prende per mano Cherubino e lo presenta a Figaro)  (takes Cherubino by the hand and presents him to Figaro)
Ed ecco chi pretende  (And here is who pretends)
che sia un bugiardo il mio signor nipote.  (that my nephew is a liar.)

FIGARO
Cherubino?  (Cherubino?)

ANTONIO  (A NTONIO)
Or ci sei.  (Now you are there.)

FIGARO
(al Conte)  (to the Count)
Che diamin canta?  (What the heck are you singing?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Non canta, no, ma dice  (No story, but says)
ch'egli saltò stamane sui garofani...  (that he jumped on the carnations this morning ...)

FIGARO
Ei lo dice! Sarà... se ho saltato io,  (He says it! Maybe ... if I jumped,)
si può dare ch'anch'esso  (it can be said that)
abbia fatto lo stesso.  (he did the same too.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Anch'esso?  (It too?)

FIGARO
Perché no?  (Why not?)
Io non impugno mai quel che non so.  (I never grab what I don't know.)
(S'ode la marcia da lontano)  (The march from afar is heard)

N. 23. Finale  (No. 23. Final)

FIGARO
Ecco la marcia, andiamo;  (Here is the march, let's go;)
ai vostri posti, oh belle, ai vostri posti.  (to your places, oh beautiful, to your places.)
Susanna, dammi il braccio.  (Susanna, give me your arm.)

SUSANNA
Eccolo!  (Here it is!)
(Partono tutti eccettuati il Conte e la Contessa)  (All leave except the Count and the Countess)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Temerari.  (Daredevils.)

LA CONTESSA
Io son di ghiaccio!  (I am of ice!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Contessa...  (Countess ...)

LA CONTESSA
Or non parliamo.  (Or not talking.)
Ecco qui le due nozze,  (Here are the two weddings,)
riceverle dobbiam, alfin si tratta  (we must receive them, at least it is)
d'una vostra protetta.  (your protégé.)
Seggiamo.  (Let's sit.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Seggiamo (e meditiam vendetta).  (be seated (and meditate on revenge).)
(Siedono; la marcia s'avvicina.)  (They sit down; the march approaches.)

SCENA XIV  (SCENE XIV)
I suddetti, Figaro, Susanna, Marcellina, Bartolo,  (The aforementioned, Figaro, Susanna, Marcellina, Bartolo,)
Antonio, Barbarina, cacciatori, contadini e contadine  (Antonio, Barbarina, hunters, peasants and peasants)

(Due giovinette che portano il cappello verginale con piume bianche,  (Two young girls wearing a virginal hat with white feathers,)
due altre un bianco velo, due altre i guanti e il mazzetto di fiori.  (two others a white veil, two others gloves and a bunch of flowers.)
Figaro con Marcellina. Due altre giovinette che portano un simile cappello per Susanna ecc.  (Figaro with Marcellina. Two other young girls wearing a similar hat for Susanna etc.)
Bartolo con Susanna. Due giovinette incominciano il coro che termina in ripieno  (Bartolo with Susanna. Two young girls they begin the choir which ends in ripieno)
Bartolo conduce la Susanna al Conte e s'inginocchia per ricever da lui il cappello ecc.  (Bartolo leads Susanna to the Count and kneels to receive the hat from him etc.)
Figaro conduce Marcellina alla Contessa e fa la stessa funzione.)  (Figaro leads Marcellina to the Countess and performs the same function.)

DUE DONNE  (D UE WOMEN)
Amanti costanti,  (Constant lovers,)
seguaci d'onor,  (followers of honor,)
cantate, lodate  (sing, praise)
sì saggio signor.  (yes wise sir.)
A un dritto cedendo,  (To a straight yielding,)
che oltraggia, che offende,  (which outrages, which offends,)
ei caste vi rende  (and caste makes you)
ai vostri amator.  (your amateurs.)

TUTTI
Cantiamo, lodiamo  (Sing the praises of)
sì saggio signor!  (so wise master!)

(I figuranti ballano. Susanna essendo in ginocchio durante il duo, tira il Conte per l'abito, gli mostra il bigliettino, dopo passa la mano dal lato degli spettatori alla testa, dove pare che il Conte le aggiusti il cappello, e gli dà il biglietto. Il Conte se lo mette furtivamente in seno, Susanna s'alza, e gli fa una riverenza. Figaro viene a riceverla, e si balla il fandango. Marecellina s'alza un po' più tardi. Bartolo viene a riceverla dalle mani della Contessa.)  (The figures dance. Susanna, being on her knees during the duo, pulls the Count by the dress, shows him the note, then passes her hand from the side of the spectators to the head, where it seems that the Count adjusts her hat, and gives him The Count puts it stealthily into his bosom, Susanna gets up, and bows him. Figaro comes to receive her, and the fandango is danced. Marecellina gets up a little later. Bartolo comes to receive her from the hands of the Countess.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(cava il biglietto e nel aprirlo si punge il dito)  (he takes out the ticket and pricks his finger as he)
Eh già, la solita usanza,  (opens it) Oh)
le donne ficcan gli aghi in ogni loco.  (yeah, the usual custom,women stick their needles in every place.)
Ah, ah, capisco il gioco.  (Ha, ha, I understand the game.)

FIGARO
(vede tutto e dice a Susanna)  (sees everything and says to Susanna)
Un biglietto amoroso  (A loving note)
che gli diè nel passar qualche galante,  (that he gave him in passing some gallant,)
ed era sigillato d'una spilla,  (and it was sealed with a pin, so)
ond'ei si punse il dito,  (he pricked his finger,)
(Il Conte legge, bacia il biglietto, cerca la spilla,  (The Count reads, kisses the note, looks for the pin,)
la trova e se la mette alla manica del saio.)  (he finds it and puts it on the sleeve of his habit.)
Il Narciso or la cerca; oh, che stordito!  (Narcissus now looks for it; oh, what a daze!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Andate, amici! E sia per questa sera  (Go, friends! And let)
disposto l'apparato nuziale  (the nuptial apparatus be arrangedfor this evening)
colla più ricca pompa; io vo' che sia  (with the richest pomp; I want)
magnifica la feste, e canti e fuochi,  (the festivities tobemagnificent, and songs and fires,)
e gran cena, e gran ballo, e ognuno impari  (and a great dinner, and a great dance, and everyone learns how I)
com'io tratto color, che a me son cari.  (treat the colors that are dear to me.)

CORO  (C GOLD)
Amanti costanti,  (Constant lovers,)
seguaci d'onor,  (honorable followers,)
cantate, lodate  (sing, praise)
sì saggio signor.  (so wise sir.)
A un dritto cedendo,  (To a straight yielding,)
che oltraggia, che offende,  (which outrages, which offends,)
ei caste vi rende  (and caste makes you)
ai vostri amator.  (your amateurs.)
Cantiamo, lodiamo  (Let's sing, praise)
sì saggio signor!  (yes wise sir!)
(Tutti partono.)  (Everyone leaves.)

Atto primo  (Act one)
Atto secondo  (Act two)
Atto terzo  (Act three)
Atto quarto  (Act four)

ATTO QUARTO  (ACT FOUR)
Gabinetto  (Toilet)

SCENA I  (SCENE I)
Barbarina sola  (Barbarina alone)

N. 24. Cavatina  (No. 24. Cavatina)

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA)
(cercando qualche cosa per terra)  (looking for something on the ground)
L'ho perduta... me meschina...  (I have lost it ... me miserable ...)
ah, chi sa dove sarà?  (ah, who knows where it will be?)
Non la trovo... E mia cugina...  (I can't find her ... And my cousin ...)
e il padron ... cosa dirà?  (and the boss ... what will he say?)

SCENA II  (SCENE II)
Barbarina, Figaro e Marcellina  (Barbarina, Figaro and Marcellina)

Recitativo

FIGARO
Barbarina, cos'hai?  (Barbarina, what have you got?)

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA)
L'ho perduta, cugino.  (I have lost you, cousin.)

FIGARO
Cosa?  (What?)

MARCELLINA
Cosa?  (What?)

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA)
La spilla,  (The brooch,)
che a me diede il padrone  (which the master gave me)
per recar a Susanna.  (to bring to Susanna.)

FIGARO
A Susanna ... la spilla?  (To Susanna ... the brooch?)
E così, tenerella,  (And so, tenerella,)
il mestiero già sai...  (you already know theprofession...)
di far tutto sì ben quel che tu fai?  (of doing everything, yes, well what you do?)

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA)
Cos'è, vai meco in collera?  (What, are you angry with me?)

FIGARO
E non vedi ch'io scherzo? Osserva...  (And can't you see I'm joking? Observe ...)
(cerca un momento per terra, dopo aver destramente cavata una spilla dall'abito  (looks for a moment on the ground, after having deftly removed a pin from)
o dalla cuffia di Marcellina e la dà a Barbarina)  (Marcellina's dress or bonnet and gives it to Barbarina)
Questa  (This)
è la spilla che il Conte  (is the pin that the Count)
da recare ti diede alla Susanna,  (gave you to Susanna to bring,)
e servia di sigillo a un bigliettino;  (and serves as a seal to a note;)
vedi s'io sono istrutto.  (see if I am educated.)

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA)
E perché il chiedi a me quando sai tutto?  (And why do you ask me when you know everything?)

FIGARO  (F IGARO I)
Avea gusto d'udir come il padrone  (had a taste for hearing how the master gave)
ti die' la commissione.  (you the commission.)

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA)
Che miracoli!  (What miracles!)
FIGARO
Ah, ah, de' pini!  (Ah, ah, the pines!)

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA)
È ver ch'ei mi soggiunse:  (It is true that he added to me:)
Guarda che alcun non veda.  (Look, no one can see.)
Ma tu già tacerai.  (But you will already be silent.)

FIGARO
Sicuramente.  (Definitely.)

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA)
A te già niente preme.  (Nothing matters to you already.)

FIGARO
Oh niente, niente.  (Oh nothing, nothing.)

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA)
Addio, mio bel cugino;  (Farewell, my beautiful cousin;)
vò da Susanna, e poi da Cherubino.  (I go to Susanna, and then to Cherubino.)
(parte saltando)  (starts jumping)

SCENA III  (SCENE III)
Marcellina e Figaro  (Marcellina and Figaro)

FIGARO
Madre!  (Mother!)

MARCELLINA
Figlio!  (Son!)

FIGARO  (F IGARO I)
Son morto!  (am dead!)

MARCELLINA
Calmati, figlio mio.  (Calm down, my son.)

FIGARO  (F IGARO I)
Son morto, dico.  ('m dead, I say.)

MARCELLINA
Flemma, flemma, e poi flemma!Il fatto è serio;  (Phlegm, phlegm, and then phlegm! The fact is serious;)
e pensarci convien, ma pensa un poco  (and think about it, but think a little)
che ancor non sai di chi prenda gioco.  (that you still don't know who is making fun of.)

FIGARO
Ah, quella spilla, oh madre, è quella stessa  (Ah, that brooch, oh mother, is the same one)
che poc'anzi ei raccolse.  (that he picked up just now.)

MARCELLINA
È ver, ma questo  (It is true, but)
al più ti porge un dritto  (at the mostthisgives you the right)
di stare in guardia, e vivere in sospetto.  (to be on your guard, and to live in suspicion.)
Ma non sai, se in effetto...  (But you don't know, if in fact ...)

FIGARO  (F IGARO On the alert)
All'erta dunque: il loco del congresso  (:)
so dov'è stabilito...  (I know wherethe site of the congressis established ...)

MARCELLINA
Dove vai figlio mio?  (Where are you going my son?)

FIGARO
A vendicar tutti i mariti: addio.  (To avenge all husbands: farewell.)
(parte)  (part)

SCENA IV  (SCENE IV)
Marcellina sola  (Marcellina alone)

Recitativo

MARCELLINA
Presto avvertiam Susanna:  (Quickly let us warn Susanna:)
io la credo innocente: quella faccia,  (I believe her innocent: that face,)
quell'aria di modestia... è caso ancora  (that air of modesty ... it is still possible)
ch'ella non fosse... ah quando il cor non ciurma personale interesse,  (that she was not ... ah when the heart does not crew personal interest,)
ogni donna è portata alla difesa  (every woman is brought to the defense)
del suo povero sesso,  (of her poor sex,)
da questi uomini ingrati a torto oppresso.  (by these ungrateful men wrongfully oppressed.)

N. 25. Aria  (No. 25. Air)

MARCELLINA
Il capro e la capretta  (The goat and the kid)
son sempre in amistà,  (are always in amistà,)
l'agnello all'agnelletta  (the lamb with the lamb)
la guerra mai non fa.  (never makes war.)
Le più feroci belve  (The most ferocious beasts)
per selve e per campagne  (in the woods and in the countryside)
lascian le lor compagne  (leave their companions)
in pace e libertà.  (in peace and freedom.)
Sol noi povere femmine  (Only we poor females)
che tanto amiam questi uomini,  (who love these men so much,)
trattate siam dai perfidi  (are treated by the perfidious each)
ognor con crudeltà!  (with cruelty!)
(parte)  (part)

SCENA V  (SCENE V)
Folto giardino con due nicchie parallele praticabili.  (Large garden with two practicable parallel niches.)
Barbarina sola con alcune frutta e ciambelle.  (Barbarina alone with some fruit and donuts.)

Recitativo

BARBARINA  (B ARBARINA)
Nel padiglione a manca: ei così disse:  (In the left-hand pavilion: and so he said:)
è questo ... è questo... e poi se non venisse!  (this is this ... this is it ... and then if he does not come!)
Oh ve' che brava gente! A stento darmi  (Oh, what good people! Barely give me)
un arancio, una pera, e una ciambella.  (an orange, a pear, and a donut.)
Per chi madamigella?  (For whom madamigella?)
Oh, per qualcun, signori:  (Oh, for some, gentlemen: we)
già lo sappiam: ebbene;  (already know: well;)
il padron l'odia, ed io gli voglio bene,  (the master hates him, and I love him,)
però costommi un bacio, e cosa importa,  (but he kisses me, and what does it matter,)
forse qualcun me'l renderà... son morta.  (maybe someone will make me ... I'm dead.)
(fugge impaurita ed entra nella nicchia a manca)  (runs away frightened and enters the niche on the left)

SCENA VI  (SCENE VI)
Figaro con mantello e lanternino notturno,  (Figaro with cloak and nocturnal lantern,)
poi Basilio, Bartolo e truppa di lavoratori  (then Basilio, Bartolo and a troop of workers)

FIGARO
È Barbarina... chi va là?  (It's Barbarina ... who goes there?)

BASILIO  (BASILIO They are the)
Son quelli  (ones)
che invitasti a venir.  (you invited to come.)

BARTOLO  (B ARTOLO)
(a Figaro)  (to Figaro)
Che brutto ceffo!  (What an ugly thug!)
Sembri un cospirator. Che diamin sono  (You look like a conspirator. What the heck are)
quegli infausti apparati?  (thoseinauspiciousapparatuses?)

FIGARO
Lo vedrete tra poco.  (You will see it shortly.)
In questo loco  (In this place we)
celebrerem la festa  (will celebrate the feast)
della mia sposa onesta  (of my honest bride)
e del feudal signor...  (and of the feudal mister ...)

BASILIO
Ah, buono, buono,  (Ah, good, good,)
capisco come egli è,  (I understand how he is,)
(Accordati si son senza di me.)  (Agree you are without me.)

FIGARO
Voi da questi contorni  (You)
non vi scostate; intanto  (do not depart from these outlines; meanwhile,)
io vado a dar certi ordini,  (I'm going to give certain orders,)
e torno in pochi istanti.  (and I'll be back in a few moments.)
A un fischio mio correte tutti quanti.  (At my whistle, all of you run.)
(Partono tutti eccettuati Bartolo e Basilio.)  (All leave except Bartolo and Basilio.)

SCENA VII  (SCENE VII)
Basilio e Bartolo  (Basilio and Bartolo)

BASILIO
Ha i diavoli nel corpo.  (He has devils in his body.)

BARTOLO  (B ARTOLO)
Ma cosa nacque?  (But what was born?)

BASILIO  (B ASYLUM)
Nulla.  (Nothing.)
Susanna piace al Conte; ella d'accordo  (Susanna pleases the Count; she agreed to give)
gli die' un appuntamento  (him an appointment)
che a Figaro non piace.  (that Figaro does not like.)

BARTOLO  (B ARTICLE)
E che, dunque dovria soffrirlo in pace?  (And what, then, will he have to suffer it in peace?)

BASILIO
Quel che soffrono tanti  (What many suffer)
ei soffrir non potrebbe? E poi sentite,  (and could notsuffer? And then listen,)
che guadagno può far? Nel mondo, amico,  (what gain can he make? In the world, my friend,)
l'accozzarla co' grandi  (mingling it with the great ones)
fu pericolo ognora:  (was always a danger: they)
dan novanta per cento e han vinto ancora.  (gave ninety percent and they won again.)

N. 26. Aria  (No. 26. Air)

BASILIO
In quegl'anni, in cui val poco  (In those years, in which)
la mal pratica ragion,  (bad practical reason is worth little,)
ebbi anch'io lo stesso foco,  (I too had the same fire,)
fui quel pazzo ch'or non son.  (I was that madman who am not now.)
Che col tempo e coi perigli  (That over time and with perils)
donna flemma capitò;  (aphlegmaticwoman happened;)
e i capricci, ed i puntigli  (and the whims, and the prickles)
della testa mi cavò.  (of the head he got out of me. She drew me to)
Presso un piccolo abituro  (a small hut)
seco lei mi trasse un giorno,  (with her one day,)
e togliendo giù dal muro  (and taking a donkey skindown from the wall)
del pacifico soggiorno  (of the peaceful living room)
una pella di somaro,  (,)
prendi disse, oh figlio caro,  (take she said, oh dear son,)
poi disparve, e mi lasciò.  (then disappeared, and left me.)
Mentre ancor tacito  (While still silent)
guardo quel dono,  (I look at that gift,)
il ciel s'annuvola  (the sky clouds)
rimbomba il tuono,  (the thunder,)
mista alla grandine  (mixed with the hail)
scroscia la piova,  (the rain pours,)
ecco le membra  (here are the limbs)
coprir mi giova  (covering it benefits me)
col manto d'asino  (with the donkey's mantle)
che mi donò.  (that he gave me.)
Finisce il turbine,  (The whirlwind ends,)
nè fo due passi  (nor do I take two steps)
che fiera orribile  (that horrible fair before)
dianzi a me fassi;  (I took;)
già già mi tocca  (already)
l'ingorda bocca,  (the greedy mouth touches me ,)
già di difendermi  (already)
speme non ho.  (I have no hope of defending myself.)
Ma il finto ignobile  (But the fake ignoble)
del mio vestito  (of my dress)
tolse alla belva  (robbed the beast of)
sì l'appetito,  (so much appetite,)
che disprezzandomi  (that by despising me)
si rinselvò.  (it recovered.)
Così conoscere  (Thus knowing made)
mi fè la sorte,  (me fate, that it is possible to)
ch'onte, pericoli,  (flee, dangers,)
vergogna, e morte  (shame, and death)
col cuoio d'asino  (with donkey leather)
fuggir si può.  (.)
(Basilio e Bartolo partono.)  (Basilio and Bartolo leave.)

SCENA VIII  (SCENE VIII)
Figaro solo  (Figaro alone)

N. 27. Recitativo ed Aria  (No. 27. Recitative and Aria)

FIGARO
Tutto è disposto: l'ora  (Everything is ready: the hour)
dovrebbe esser vicina; io sento gente.  (should be near; I hear people.)
È dessa... non è alcun... buia è la notte...  (She is ... she is not any ... dark is the night ...)
ed io comincio omai,  (and now I begin)
a fare il scimunito  (to do the)
mestiero di marito.  (stupid job of a husband.)
Ingrata! Nel momento  (Ungrateful! At the moment)
della mia cerimonia  (of my ceremony he)
ei godeva leggendo, e nel vederlo  (enjoyed reading, and seeing him)
io rideva di me, senza saperlo.  (I laughed at me, without knowing it.)
Oh Susanna, Susanna,  (Oh Susanna, Susanna,)
quanta pena mi costi,  (how much pain do you cost me,)
con quell'ingenua faccia...  (with that)
con quegli occhi innocenti...  (naiveface ...with those innocent eyes ...)
chi creduto l'avria?  (who thought it was?)
Ah, che il fidarsi a donna è ognor follia.  (Ah, that trusting a woman is always madness.)

Aprite un po' quegl'occhi,  (Open those eyes a little,)
uomini incauti e sciocchi,  (unwary and foolish men,)
guardate queste femmine,  (look at these females,)
guardate cosa son!  (see what they are!)
Queste chiamate Dee  (These called Goddesses)
dagli ingannati sensi  (by the deceived senses)
a cui tributa incensi  (to which)
la debole ragion,  (feeble reason pays incense ,)
son streghe che incantano  (are witches who enchant)
per farci penar,  (to make us suffer,)
sirene che cantano  (sirens who sing)
per farci affogar,  (to make us drown,)
civette che allettano  (owls that entice to draw)
per trarci le piume,  (feathers,)
comete che brillano  (comets that shine)
per toglierci il lume;  (to take away the light;)
son rose spinose,  (they are thorny roses, they)
son volpi vezzose,  (are charming foxes, they)
son orse benigne,  (are benign bears,)
colombe maligne,  (malignant doves,)
maestre d'inganni,  (masters of deceit,)
amiche d'affanni  (friends of trouble)
che fingono, mentono,  (who pretend, lie,)
amore non senton,  (love do not feel,)
non senton pietà,  (feel no pity,)
no, no, no, no!  (no, no, no, no!)
Il resto nol dico,  (I won't say the rest,)
già ognun lo sa!  (everyone already knows!)
(si ritira)  (withdraws)

SCENA IX  (SCENE IX)
Susanna, la Contessa travestite; Marcellina  (Susanna, the Countess in disguise; Marcellina)

Recitativo

SUSANNA
Signora, ella mi disse  (Madam, she told me)
che Figaro verravvi.  (that Figaro would come to you.)

MARCELLINA
Anzi è venuto.  (Indeed he has come.)
Abbassa un po' la voce.  (Lower your voice a little.)

SUSANNA
Dunque, un ci ascolta, e l'altro  (So, one listens to us, and the other has)
dee venir a cercarmi,  (to come looking for me, let's)
incominciam.  (start.)

MARCELLINA
(entra dove entrò Barbarina)  (enters where Barbarina entered)
Io voglio qui celarmi.  (I want to hide here.)

SCENA X  (SCENE X)
I suddetti, Figaro in disparte  (The above, Figaro on the sidelines)

SUSANNA
Madama, voi tremate; avreste freddo?  (Madam, you tremble; would you be cold?)

LA CONTESSA
Parmi umida la notte; io mi ritiro.  (Parmi wet night; I withdraw.)

FIGARO
(Eccoci della crisi al grande istante.)  (Here we are in the crisis at the great moment.)

SUSANNA
Io sotto questi piante,  (Under these plants,)
se madama il permette,  (if madam permits, I will)
resto prendere il fresco una mezz'ora.  (stay cool for half an hour.)

FIGARO
(Il fresco, il fresco!)  (The cool, the cool!)

LA CONTESSA
(si nasconde)  (hides)
Restaci in buon'ora.  (Stay there in early.)

SUSANNA
Il birbo è in sentinella.  (The rascal is on guard.)
Divertiamci anche noi,  (Let us have fun too,)
diamogli la mercé de' dubbi suoi.  (letusgive him the mercy of his doubts.)

N. 28. Recitativoed Aria  (No. 28. Recitative and Aria)

SUSANNA
Giunse alfin il momento  (The moment has)
che godrò senz'affanno  (finally come that I will enjoy without worry)
in braccio all'idol mio. Timide cure,  (in the arms of my idol. Shy cares, get)
uscite dal mio petto,  (out of my breast,)
a turbar non venite il mio diletto!  (don't come to trouble my beloved!)
Oh, come par che all'amoroso foco  (Oh, how it seems that)
l'amenità del loco,  (the amenity of the place,)
la terra e il ciel risponda,  (the earth and the sky respondsto the amorous fire,)
come la notte i furti miei seconda!  (like the night my second thefts!)

Deh, vieni, non tardar, oh gioia bella,  (Oh, come, do not delay, oh beautiful joy,)
vieni ove amore per goder t'appella,  (come where love appeals to you,)
finché non splende in ciel notturna face,  (until it shines in the nocturnal sky,)
finché l'aria è ancor bruna e il mondo tace.  (until the air is still dark and the world is silent.)
Qui mormora il ruscel, qui scherza l'aura,  (Here the brook murmurs, here the aura jokes,)
che col dolce sussurro il cor ristaura,  (that with the sweet whisper the cor ristaura, here the foils)
qui ridono i fioretti e l'erba è fresca,  (laugh and the grass is fresh,)
ai piaceri d'amor qui tutto adesca.  (here everything entices to the pleasures of love.)
Vieni, ben mio, tra queste piante ascose,  (Come, my dear, among these hidden plants,)
ti vo' la fronte incoronar di rose.  (I want your forehead to be crowned with roses.)

SCENA XI  (SCENE XI)
I suddetti e poi Cherubino  (The above and then Cherubino)

Recitativo

FIGARO
Perfida, e in quella forma  (Wicked, and in that form)
ella meco mentia? Non so s'io veglio, o dormo.  (she lies to me? I don't know if I awake or sleep.)

CHERUBINO
La la la ...  (La la la ...)

LA CONTESSA
Il picciol paggio.  (The Picciol page.)

CHERUBINO
Io sento gente, entriamo  (I hear people, we enter)
ove entrò Barbarina.  (where Barbarina entered.)
Oh, vedo qui una donna.  (Oh, I see a woman here.)

LA CONTESSA
Ahi, me meschina!  (Ah, wretched me!)

CHERUBINO
M'inganno, a quel cappello,  (I am deceived by that hat,)
che nell'ombra vegg'io parmi Susanna.  (which in the shadows I see seems to me Susanna.)

LA CONTESSA
E se il Conte ora vien, sorte tiranna!  (And if the Count should come now, fate tyrant!)

N.29. Finale  (No. 29. The final)

CHERUBINO
Pian pianin le andrò più presso,  (Slowly I will go closer to you,)
tempo perso non sarà.  (there will be no wasted time.)

LA CONTESSA
(Ah, se il Conte arriva adesso  (Ah, if the Count comes)
qualche imbroglio accaderà!)  (along what a fight there will be!)

CHERUBINO
(alla Contessa)  (to the Countess)
Susanetta... non risponde...  (Susanetta ... she does not answer ...)
colla mano il volto asconde...  (with her hand she)
or la burlo, in verità.  (hidesher face ...now I am laughing at her, in truth.)
(le prende la mano e l'accarezza)  (takes her hand and caresses it)

LA CONTESSA
(cerca liberarsi)  (free search)
Arditello, sfacciatello,  (Presumptuous, impudent boy,)
ite presto via di qua!  (go away from here!)

CHERUBINO  (CHERUBINO Grim)
Smorfiosa, maliziosa,  (, mischievous,)
io già so perché sei qua!  (I already know why you're here!)

SCENA XII  (SCENE XII)
I suddetti ed il Conte  (The aforementioned and the Count)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ecco qui la mia Susanna!  (Here is my Susanna!)

SUSANNA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA and F IGARO)
Ecco qui l'uccellatore.  (Here is the fowler .)

CHERUBINO
Non far meco la tiranna.  (Do not be a tyrant with me.)

SUSANNA, IL CONTE e FIGARO  (SUSANNA , The L C ONTE and F IGARO)
Ah, nel sen mi batte il core!  (Ah sen beats me in the heart!)
Un altr'uom con lei sta;  (Another man is with her;)
alla voce è quegli il paggio.  (to the voice is that the page.)

LA CONTESSA
Via partite, o chiamo gente!  (Via games, or I'll call!)

CHERUBINO
(sempre tenendola per la mano)  (still holding her hand)
Dammi un bacio, o non fai niente.  (Give me a kiss, or you don't do anything.)

LA CONTESSA
Anche un bacio, che coraggio!  (Even a kiss, what courage!)

CHERUBINO
E perché far io non posso,  (And why can't I do)
quel che il Conte ognor farà?  (what the Count will each do?)

SUSANNA, LA CONTESSA, IL CONTE e FIGARO  (SUSANNA , L A C ONTESSA , The Count and F IGARO)
(Temerario!)  (Bold!)

CHERUBINO
Oh ve', che smorfie!  (Oh there, what grimaces!)
Sai ch'io fui dietro il sofà.  (You know I was behind the sofa.)

SUSANNA, LA CONTESSA, IL CONTE e FIGARO  (SUSANNA , L A C ONTESSA , The Count and F IGARO)
(Se il ribaldo ancor sta saldo  (If the rake stays much)
la faccenda guasterà.)  (the spoil matter.)

CHERUBINO
(volendo dar un bacio alla Contessa)  (wanting to kiss the Countess)
Prendi intanto...  (Meanwhile take ...)
(Il Conte, mettendosi tra la Contessa ed il paggio, riceve il bacio.)  (The Count, placing himself between the Countess and the page, receives the kiss.)

LA CONTESSA e CHERUBINO  (L A C ONTESSA and CHERUBINO)
Oh cielo, il Conte!  (Oh dear, Count!)
(Cherubino entra da Barbarina.)  (Cherubino enters from Barbarina.)

FIGARO
(appressandosi al Conte)  (approaching the Count)
Vo' veder cosa fan là.  (I want to see what they do there.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(crede di dar uno schiaffo al paggio e lo dà a Figaro)  (believed to give a slap to the page, and gives it to Figaro)
Perché voi nol ripetete,  (Because you repeat it not,)
ricevete questo qua!  (take that!)

FIGARO, SUSANNA e LA CONTESSA  (F IGARO , SUSANNA and L A C ONTESSA)
(Ah, ci ho/ha fatto un bel guadagno  (Ah, I have / he made a good profit out of)
colla mia/sua curiosità!)  (my / her curiosity!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ah, ci ha fatto un bel guadagno  (Ah, he made a nice gain)
colla sua temerità!  (his temerity glue!)
(Figaro si ritira.)  (Figaro retires.)

(alla Contessa)  (to the Countess)
Partito è alfin l'audace,  (Party is at least daring,)
accostati ben mio!  (approach my dear!)

LA CONTESSA
Giacché così vi piace,  (Because as you like,)
eccomi qui signor.  (here I am Mr.)

FIGARO
Che compiacente femmina!  (What a complacent female!)
Che sposa di buon cor!  (What a bride with a good heart!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Porgimi la manina!  (Give me your hand!)

LA CONTESSA
Io ve la do.  (I give it.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Carina!  (Carina!)

FIGARO
Carina!  (Cute!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Che dita tenerelle,  (What dainty fingers,)
che delicata pelle,  (that delicate skin,)
mi pizzica, mi stuzzica,  (pinches me, tease me,)
m'empie d'un nuovo ardor.  (m'empie of a new ardor.)

SUSANNA, LA CONTESSA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA , L A C ONTESSA and F IGARO)
La cieca prevenzione  (Blind prevention)
delude la ragione  (deludes reason and)
inganna i sensi ognor.  (always tricks the senses.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Oltre la dote, oh cara,  (Besides the dowry, beloved,)
ricevi anco un brillante  (receive likewise a brilliant)
che a te porge un amante  (, offered by a lover)
in pegno del suo amor.  (in pledge of his love.)
(le dà un anello)  (gives her a ring)

LA CONTESSA
Tutto Susanna piglia  (Susanna owes eveything)
dal suo benefattor.  (from his benefactor.)

SUSANNA, IL CONTE e FIGARO  (SUSANNA , The Count and F IGARO)
Va tutto a maraviglia,  (It's all in astonishment,)
ma il meglio manca ancor.  (but better still missing.)

LA CONTESSA
(al Conte)  (the Count)
Signor, d'accese fiaccole  (My lord, the torches lit)
io veggio il balenar.  (I see the were lightning.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Entriam, mia bella Venere,  (Let us enter, my fair Venus,)
andiamoci a celar!  (let's go in and hide!)

SUSANNA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA and F IGARO You foolish)
Mariti scimuniti,  (husbands,)
venite ad imparar!  (come and learn!)

LA CONTESSA
Al buio, signor mio?  (In the dark, my lord?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
È quello che vogl'io.  ('s what vogl'io.)
Tu sai che là per leggere  (You know that)
io non desio d'entrar.  (I don't wantto go there to read.)

SUSANNA e LA CONTESSA  (SUSANNA and L A C ONTESSA)
I furbi sono in trappola,  (The clever ones are trapped,)
comincia ben l'affar.  (the business begins.)

FIGARO
La perfida lo seguita,  (The perfidious followed him, doubting)
è vano il dubitar.  (is vain.)
(passa)  (passes)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Chi passa?  (Who goes?)

FIGARO
Passa gente!  (People come by!)

LA CONTESSA
È Figaro; men vò!  (is Figaro; men go!)
(entra a man destra)  (enter on the right hand)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Andate; io poi verrò.  (Go; then I will come.)
(si disperde pel bosco)  (disperses through the woods)

SCENA XIII  (SCENE XIII)
Figaro e Susanna  (Figaro and Susanna)

FIGARO
Tutto è tranquillo e placido;  (Everything is calm and placid;)
entrò la bella Venere;  (the beautiful Venus entered;)
col vago Marte a prendere  (with the vague Mars to take the)
nuovo Vulcan del secolo  (new Vulcan of the century)
in rete la potrò.  (on the net I will be able.)

SUSANNA
Ehi, Figaro, tacete.  (Hey, Figaro, shut up.)

FIGARO
Oh, questa è la Contessa...  (Oh, this is the Countess ...)
A tempo qui giungete...  (In time you will come here ...)
Vedrete là voi stessa...  (You will see there yourself ...)
il Conte, e la mia sposa...  (the Count, and my bride ...)
di propria man la cosa  (of your own hand)
toccar io vi farò.  (I will dothe thing toyou.)

SUSANNA
Parlate un po' più basso,  (Talk a little lower,)
di qua non muovo il passo,  (from here I do not move the step,)
ma vendicar mi vò.  (but I want to take revenge.)

FIGARO
(Susanna!) Vendicarsi?  (Susanna!) Take revenge ?)

SUSANNA
Sì.  (Yes.)

FIGARO
Come potria farsi?  (How can it be done?)

SUSANNA
(L'iniquo io vo' sorprendere,  (The iniquitous I want to surprise,)
poi so quel che farò.)  (then I know what I will do.)

FIGARO
(La volpe vuol sorprendermi,  (The fox wants to surprise me,)
e secondarla vò.)  (and I want to support her.)
Ah se madama il vuole!  (Ah if madame wants it!)

SUSANNA  (SUSANNA Come)
Su via, manco parole.  (on, I need no words.)

FIGARO
Eccomi a' vostri piedi...  (Here I am at your feet ...)
ho pieno il cor di foco...  (I have my heart full of fire ...)
Esaminate il loco...  (Examine the place ...)
pensate al traditor.  (think of the traitor.)

SUSANNA
(Come la man mi pizzica,  (How my hand pinches me,)
che smania, che furor!)  (what a craving, what furor!)

FIGARO
(Come il polmon mi s'altera,  (How my lung gets upset,)
che smania, che calor!)  (what a craving, what heat!)

SUSANNA
E senz'alcun affetto?  (And without any affection?)

FIGARO  (F IGARO You were)
Suppliscavi il dispetto.  (compensating for the spite.)
Non perdiam tempo invano,  (Let's not waste time in vain,)
datemi un po' la mano...  (give me your hand ...)

SUSANNA
(gli dà uno schiaffo)  (slaps him)
Servitevi, signor.  (Help yourself, sir.)

FIGARO
Che schiaffo!  (What a slap!)

SUSANNA
(ancor uno)  (one more)
Che schiaffo,  (What a slap,)
(lo schiaffeggia a tempo)  (slaps him in time)
e questo, e questo,  (and this, and this,)
e ancora questo, e questo, e poi quest'altro.  (and again this, and this, and then this other.)

FIGARO
Non batter così presto.  (Don't beat so early.)

SUSANNA
E questo, signor scaltro,  (And this, crafty sir,)
e questo, e poi quest'altro ancor.  (and this, and then this one again.)

FIGARO
O schiaffi graziosissimi,  (O very pretty slaps,)
oh, mio felice amor.  (oh, my happy love.)

SUSANNA
Impara, impara, oh perfido,  (Learn, learn, oh perfidious,)
a fare il seduttor.  (to be a seducer.)

SCENA XIV  (SCENE XIV)
I suddetti e poi il Conte  (The above and then the Count)

FIGARO
Pace, pace, mio dolce tesoro,  (Peace, peace, my sweet treasure,)
io conobbi la voce che adoro  (I knew the voice that I adore)
e che impressa ognor serbo nel cor.  (and that impressed each Serbian in the heart.)

SUSANNA
La mia voce?  (My voice?)

FIGARO
La voce che adoro.  (The voice I adore.)

SUSANNA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA and F IGARO)
Pace, pace, mio dolce tesoro,  (Peace, peace, my sweet treasure,)
pace, pace, mio tenero amor.  (peace, peace, my tender love.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Non la trovo e girai tutto il bosco.  (not find it and I've combed the woods.)

SUSANNA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA and F IGARO)
Questi è il Conte, alla voce il conosco.  (This is the Count, I know him by voice.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(parlando verso la nicchia, dove entrò madama, cui apre egli stesso)  (talking to the alcove, where he entered Madame, which he opens himself)
Ehi, Susanna.. sei sorda... sei muta?  (Hey, Susanna .. are you deaf ... you dumb?)

SUSANNA
Bella, bella! Non l'ha conosciuta.  (Beautiful, beautiful! He didn't know her.)

FIGARO
Chi?  (Who?)

SUSANNA
Madama!  (Madam!)

FIGARO
Madama?  (Madame?)

SUSANNA
Madama!  (Madam!)

SUSANNA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA and F IGARO)
La commedia, idol mio, terminiamo,  (The comedy, my idol, let's finish, let's)
consoliamo il bizzarro amator!  (console the bizarre amateur!)

FIGARO
(si mette ai piedi di Susanna)  (puts himself at Susanna's feet)
Sì, madama, voi siete il ben mio!  (Yes, madam, you are mine!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
La mia sposa! Ah, senz'arme son io.  (My bride! Ah, without an alarm I am.)

FIGARO  (F IGARO Give)
Un ristoro al mio cor concedete.  (my heart a refreshment.)

SUSANNA
Io son qui, faccio quel che volete.  (I am here, I do what you want.)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Ah, ribaldi!  (Ah, rascals!)

SUSANNA e FIGARO  (SUSANNA and F IGARO)
Ah, corriamo, mio bene,  (Ah, let us run, my good,)
e le pene compensi il piacer.  (and the pains compensate for the pleasure.)
(Susanna entra nella nicchia.)  (Susanna enters the niche.)

SCENA ULTIMA  (LAST SCENE)
I suddetti, Antonio, Basilio, servitori con fiaccole accese;  (The aforesaid, Antonio, Basilio, servants with lighted torches;)
poi Susanna, Marcellina, Cherubino, Barbarina; indi la Contessa  (then Susanna, Marcellina, Cherubino, Barbarina; then the Countess)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(arresta Figaro)  (stops Figaro)
Gente, gente, all'armi, all'armi!  (People, people, weapons, weapons!)

FIGARO
Il padrone!  (The master!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Gente, gente, aiuto, aiuto!  (Help, help, help, help!)

FIGARO  (F IGARO I)
Son perduto!  (am lost!)

BASILIO ed ANTONIO  (BASILIO and A NTONIO)
Cosa avvenne?  (What happened?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Il scellerato  (The villain)
m'ha tradito, m'ha infamato  (has betrayed, disgraced me)
e con chi state a veder!  (and with whom you shall see!)

BASILIO ed ANTONIO  (BASILIO and A NTONIO I)
Son stordito, son sbalordito,  (am stunned, I am amazed, it)
non mi par che ciò sia ver!  (does not seem to me that this is true!)

FIGARO  (F IGARO They are)
Son storditi, son sbalorditi,  (stunned, they are amazed,)
oh che scena, che piacer!  (oh what a scene, what a pleasure!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
(tira pel braccio Cherubino, dopo Barbarina, Marcellina e Susanna)  (pel pulls Cherubino arm after Barbarina, Marcellina and Susanna)
Invan resistete,  (In vain resist,)
uscite, madama,  (outputs, madam,)
il premio or avrete  (your prize or you will have)
di vostra onestà!  (to your honesty!)
Il paggio!  (The page!)

ANTONIO
Mia figlia!  (My daughter!)

FIGARO
Mia madre!  (My mother!)

BASILIO, ANTONIO e FIGARO  (BASILIO , A NTONIO and F IGARO)
Madama!  (Madama!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Scoperta è la trama,  (Discovery is the plot,)
la perfida è qua.  (the evil is here.)

SUSANNA
(s'inginocchia ai piedi del Conte)  (kneels at the Count's feet)
Perdono! Perdono!  (Forgiveness! Pardon!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
No, no, non sperarlo.  (No, no, no hope.)

FIGARO
(s'inginocchia)  (kneels)
Perdono! Perdono!  (Forgiveness! Pardon!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
No, no, non vo' darlo!.  (No, no, I will 'give it !.)

BARTOLO, CHERUBINO, MARCELLINA, BASILIO,  (B ARTOLO, CHERUBINO, MARCELLINA, BASILIO,)
ANTONIO, SUSANNA e FIGARO  (A NTONIO, SUSANNA and F IGARO)
(s'inginocchiano)  (kneel)
Perdono! Perdono!  (Forgive me! Pardon!)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
No, no, no!  (No, no, no!)

LA CONTESSA
(esce dall'altra nicchia e vuole inginocchiarsi, il Conte nol permette)  (out other niche and want to kneel, the Count allows nol)
Almeno io per loro  (At least I do for them)
perdono otterrò.  (forgiveness will get.)

BASILIO, IL CONTE e ANTONIO  (BASILIO , The L C ONTE and A NTONIO)
(Oh cielo, che veggio!  (Oh my God, what do I see!)
Deliro! Vaneggio!  (Delirious! Going crazy!)
Che creder non so?)  (What belief do not know?)

IL CONTE  (The Count)
Contessa, perdono!  (Countess, forgive me!)

LA CONTESSA
Più docile io sono,  (More docile I am,)
e dico di sì.  (and I say yes.)

TUTTI
Ah, tutti contenti  (Ah, all happy)
saremo così.  (we will be well.)
Questo giorno di tormenti,  (This day of torments,)
di capricci, e di follia,  (whims, and madness,)
in contenti e in allegria  (in contentment and joy)
solo amor può terminar.  (only love can end.)
Sposi, amici, al ballo, al gioco,  (Spouses, friends, to the dance, to the game,)
alle mine date foco!  (to the mines given fire!)
Ed al suon di lieta marcia  (And to the sound of happy march)
corriam tutti a festeggiar!.  (let's all run to celebrate!)

Atto primo  (Act one)
Atto secondo  (Act two)
Atto terzo  (Act three)
Atto quarto  (Act four)